Andrew Lane & Nigel Foster – Netherspace

This is another Wiebe review!

First contact is only the beginning…

Contact with aliens was made fourty years  ago, but communication turned out to be impossible. Humans don’t share a way of thinking with with any of the alien species, let alone a grammar. But there is trade, trade that produces scientific advances that would have taken thousands of years.

Earth may be a better place but it is no longer our own. We may be colonizing the stars, but we’re dependent on inexplicable alien netherspace drives, and they come at a heavy cost: live humans. When a group of colonists are captured by Cancri aliens, a human mission is sent to negotiate their releasse. But how can you negotiate when you don’t know what your target wants or why they took your people in the first place?

For my next read I semi-randomly picked Netherspace by Andrew Lane and Nigel Foster out of our many boxes of too-read-books. Our bookcases are coming next Monday (Editor’s Note: This review was written on November 16, the bookcases are standing right now). I had to put this book down after reading 130-some pages, as I was starting to hate-read this book. I know I am a very particular and unforgiving reader. Anytime the setting or the writing style takes me out of the story to go “wtf!” it detracts from my reading experience. This book did this too often and I just had to put it down.  Read More …

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Chris Brookmyre – Places in the Darkness

As announced previously, my husband Wiebe is going to be contributing reviews more regularly. Chris Brookmyre’s Places in the Darkness is his first review on A Fantastical Librarian in a while.

This is as close to a city without crime as mankind has ever seen.

Ciudad de cielo is the city in the sky, a space station where hundreds of scientists and engineers work in earth orbit, building the colony ship that will one day take humanity to the stars.

When a mutilated body is found on the CdC, the eyes of the world are watching. Top-of-the-class investigator Alice Blake, is sent from earth to team up with CdC’s Freeman – a jaded cop with more reason than most to distrust such planetside interference.

As the death toll climbs and factions aboard the station become more and more fractious, Freeman and Blake will discover clues to a conspiracy that threatens not only their own lives but the future of humanity itself.

Based on the copy on the back of the book, I judged Places in the Darkness to be a detective novel set in space. From the rest of the cover I saw that this is not the first crime novel Chis Brookmyre has written. Writing crime in a completely fictional stetting is a hard thing to do. Not only do you have all the elements for your crime, you also have to explain the universe the story is set in. You need to split your focus and risk not doing a good job on one or both of these elements.  Read More …

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UPDATED: Julie Czerneda Giveaway Winner

Cover art by Matthew Stawicki

UPDATE: VegasLass let me know she already had a copy and requested I select a new winner. So congratulations to

Guy Stewart!

With apologies for taking so long, I finally have a winner for the Czerneda giveaway:

VegasLass

I hope you’ll enjoy the book!

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Ch-Ch-Changes…

As you may have noticed, it has been rather quiet of late. I know that I still owe you a winner of the Julie Czerneda giveaway, which will come later this week. But today I want to announce some changes to the blog. In the past year, finding the energy and time to blog has been a struggle. In some ways blogging just wasn’t fun anymore. I often jokingly said that I had three jobs: being a mum, my day job, and the blog. But that’s actually not a really healthy situation, especially if I want to do other things as well. So to make the blog feel like a joyful thing again instead of a chore, I will have to make changes.  Read More …

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Guest Post: Julie Czerneda on Saying Goodbye [plus giveaway!]

Cover art by Matthew Stawicki

Over the past few years I’ve been fortunate enough to have Julie Czerneda visit my blog as part of her tours for her latest releases. Today she is back with another one, but one that is a true milestone: the release of the final book in her Clan Chronicles. With To Guard Against The Dark, book three in the Reunification trilogy, she brings to an end a series that she started twenty years ago. I wondered how you say goodbye to characters you’ve lived with for so long. Julie wrote me the following beautiful post. Warning: tissues required! If you want to be in with a chance to win a hardcover of the book check the giveaway details at the end of the post.  Read More …

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Alan Gratz – Ban This Book

It all started the day Amy Anne Ollinger tried to check out her favorite book in the whole world, From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, from the school library. That’s when Mrs. Jones, the librarian, told her the bad news: her favorite book was banned! All because a classmate’s mom thought the book wasn’t appropriate for kids to read. 

Amy Anne decides to fight back by starting a secret banned-books library out of her locker. As word spreads, Amy Anne’s locker stash quickly grows into a school-wide sensation. Soon, she and her friends find themselves on the front line of an unexpected battle over book banning, censorship, and who has the right to decide what kids can read. 

This past week has been Banned Books Week in US, so it seemed an appropriate time to review Alan Gratz’s latest middle grade novel, Ban This Book. When offered the book for review, I jumped at the chance as the whole banning books phenomenon has always been slightly baffling to me, as it doesn’t really happen in the same way here in the Netherlands. The idea of keeping kids from reading anything that isn’t catastrophically inappropriate is strange to me. In my opinion, no one tells my girls what they can and can’t read, but me and their dad. And of course as a librarian, the issue is near and dear to my heart, so I was curious to see how Gratz would approach the concept.  Read More …

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N.K. Jemisin – The Stone Sky

The Moon will soon return.

Whether this heralds the destruction of humankind or something worse will depend on two women.

Essun has inherited the phenomenal power of Alabaster Tenring. With it, she hopes to find her daughter Nassun and forge a world in which every outcast child can grow up safe.

For Nassun, her mother’s mastery of the Obelisk Gate comes too late. She has seen the evil of the world, and accepted what her mother will not admit: that sometimes what is corrupt cannot be cleansed, only destroyed.

Let me be frank about my opinions of this book up front. The Stone Sky is magnificent and brings N.K. Jemisin’s The Broken Earth trilogy to a triumphal close. If you want to TL;DR this review, you can now click away and go and buy this entire series. But for those of you who want to know more about why I feel this way, I will try to be somewhat coherent in discussing what I loved about this book and why I think so highly of it.  Read More …

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Stephanie Burgis – Snowspelled

In nineteenth-century Angland, magic is reserved for gentlemen while ladies attend to the more practical business of politics. But Cassandra Harwood has never followed the rules…

Four months ago, Cassandra Harwood was the first woman magician in Angland, and she was betrothed to the brilliant, intense love of her life.

Now Cassandra is trapped in a snowbound house party deep in the elven dales, surrounded by bickering gentleman magicians, manipulative lady politicians, her own interfering family members, and, worst of all, her infuriatingly stubborn ex-fiancé, who refuses to understand that she’s given him up for his own good.

But the greatest danger of all lies outside the manor in the falling snow, where a powerful and malevolent elf-lord lurks…and Cassandra lost all of her own magic four months ago.

To save herself, Cassandra will have to discover exactly what inner powers she still possesses – and risk everything to win a new kind of happiness.

When I was sixteen I fell deeply and utterly in love with the writing of Jane Austen. I started with Pride and Prejudice — this was the year the famous BBC adaptation starring Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth first aired. Naturally, this was a complete coincidence — and made my way steadily through all of her published writing. I must have read Pride and Prejudice a dozen times and watched that series about half a dozen times. And to this day, I have a weak spot for anything resembling that world and her snark. Fast forward 22 years and here we are in the present where I fell in a similar kind of love with Stephanie Burgis’ latest novella Snowspelled, the first in The Harwood SpellbookRead More …

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Cassandra Khaw – Bearly a Lady

Zelda McCartney (almost) has it all: a badass superhero name, an awesome vampire roommate, and her dream job at a glossy fashion magazine (plus the clothes to prove it).

The only issue in Zelda’s almost-perfect life? The uncontrollable need to transform into a werebear once a month.

Just when Zelda thinks things are finally turning around and she lands a hot date with Jake, her high school crush and alpha werewolf of Kensington, life gets complicated. Zelda receives an unusual work assignment from her fashionable boss: play bodyguard for devilishly charming fae nobleman Benedict (incidentally, her boss’s nephew) for two weeks. Will Zelda be able to resist his charms long enough to get together with Jake? And will she want to?

Because true love might have been waiting around the corner the whole time in the form of Janine, Zelda’s long-time crush and colleague.

What’s a werebear to do?

Cassandra Khaw’s Bearly a Lady is the 3rd publication in the Book Smugglers’ Novella Initiative. It looked amazing and the blurb —with its Devil Wears Prada meets Bridget Jones meets Teenwolf vibe with bonus Fae — made it sound like it would be just too much fun! And the blurb absolutely delivered. This book reminded me so much of the late nineties/early oughts chick lit I loved and provided me with the same happy feelings at the end of the book that they did. And like many of the books I loved at the time, Bearly a Lady hides some crunch amid the fluff.  Read More …

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In The News: Killing Rumer Unbound

I’ve previously reviewed Joshua Winning first two books in the Sentinel Trilogy, Sentinel and Ruins, which I really loved. When Josh contacted me about his new book Killing Rumer, which is currently in the pledging stage over at Unbound, I was excited that he had more work on the way. I was immediately intrigued by its main character Rumer Cross; dark, hard, and tough as nails, she sounded really cool.  Read More …

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