Anticipated Books (Winter-Spring) 2015: Historical Fiction January-March

2015Welcome to the next post in my Anticipated Books series for the first half of 2015. Like fantasy, there were too many historical fiction books that caught my fancy for one post, so they’ve been split in two. For some of these I already have an (e)ARC or review copy, so they’ll definitely be read and reviewed. And for the rest, I’ll have to see whether I get the chance to get my hands on them!   Read More …

Isla Morley – Above

islamorley-aboveNOTHING IS AS IT SEEMS…

Blythe, a sixteen-year-old Kansas schoolgirl is abducted and kept in an abandoned silo by a survivalist, who is convinced that the world is about to end.

Struggling to survive, crushed by loneliness and the terrifying madness of her captor, Blythe resists the temptation to give up. Nothing, however, prepares her for the burden of having to raise a child in confinement.

Just when Blythe starts to believe that she may be confined to the silo for life, their lives are ambushed by one event that is at once promising and devastating…

THINK YOU KNOW WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN? YOU REALLY DON’T…

Isla Morley’s Above was Hodderscape’s Review Project title for the month of April – a project that I’m woefully behind on, something I aim to fix in the near future – and when I first received my ARC and read the synopsis, I was all kinds of intrigued. The notion of children, and sadly it’s most often girls, being snatched and hidden away horrifies me, both as a human being and as a mum. I can only imagine the pain Blythe’s parents go through when she disappeared, however Above doesn’t consider this at all. Above is all about Blythe, about her experiences and her captivity; we feel her panic, her anger, her despair and eventually her hope for a better, different life. Above delivers a harrowing tale, one that has a happy ending with a giant twist, which was fascinating not because ‘Whoa! Apocalypse’, but because of the emotional turmoil it throws Blythe into and the fascinating questions it poses of both Blythe and the reader.  Read More …