Robert Jackson Bennett – Foundryside

The city of Tevanne runs on scrivings, industrialised magical inscriptions that make inanimate objects sentient; they power everything, from walls to wheels to weapons. Scrivings have brought enormous progress and enormous wealth — but only to the four merchant Houses who control them. Everyone else is a servant or slave, or they eke a precarious living in the hellhole called the Commons.

There’s not much in the way of work for an escaped slave like Sancia Grado, but she has an unnatural talent that makes her one of the best thieves in the city. When she’s offered a lucrative job to steal an ancient artefact from a heavily guarded warehouse, Sancia agrees, dreaming of leaving the Commons — but instead, she finds herself the target of a murderous conspiracy. Someone powerful in Tevanne wants the artefact, and Sancia dead — and whoever it is already wields power beyond imagining.

Sancia will need every ally, and every ounce of wits at her disposal, if she is to survive — because if her enemy gets the artefact and unlocks its secrets, thousands will die, and, even worse, it will allow ancient evils back into the world and turn their city into a devastated battleground.

While Foundryside is Robert Jackson Bennett’s eighth novel, I haven’t read much early Bennett. I started with his previous series, The Divine Cities Trilogy, the first two of which I loved. The last one is waiting for me to read it, as I’m loathe to finish the last book in that world. Yet when Foundryside rolled around I couldn’t stop myself from jumping for it, since I know the author can write like no one’s business. And I wasn’t disappointed because the tale told in this first book of the Founders trilogy was utterly captivating.  Read More …

Angela Slatter – Restoration

Walking between the worlds has always been dangerous — but this time V’s facing the loss of all she holds dear.

Verity Fassbinder thought no boss could be worse than her perfectionist ex-boyfriend — until she grudgingly agreed to work for a psychotic fallen angel. But dealing with a career change not entirely of her own choosing is doing nothing to improve V’s fractious temper. The angel is a jealous — and violent — employer, so she’s quit working for the Weyrd Council and sent her family away, for their own safety. Instead of indulging in domestic bliss, she’s got to play BFFs with the angel’s little spy, Joyce the kitsune assassin, who comes with her own murderous problems.

The angel has tasked V with finding two lost treasures. That would be hard even without a vengeful Dusana Nadasy on her heels. And Inspector McIntyre won’t stop calling: the bodies of Normal women who disappeared decades ago are turning up, apparently subjected to Weyrd magics. Angelic demands or not, this isn’t something she can walk away from.

And the angel is getting impatient for results…

Restoration is book three in Angela Slatter’s Verity Fassbinder trilogy and the only thing that made finishing this book bearable, was the fact that Slatter teases more books to come in her author’s note at the beginning of the book. Because Reader, this series might be my favourite urban fantasy series at the moment and Verity Fassbinder my all time favourite urban fantasy heroine. So the thought that this would be goodbye was painful.  Read More …

Angela Slatter – Corpselight

Life in Brisbane is never simple for those who walk between the worlds.

Verity’s all about protecting her city, but right now that’s mostly running surveillance and handling the less exciting cases for the Weyrd Council – after all, it’s hard to chase the bad guys through the streets of Brisbane when you’re really, really pregnant.

An insurance investigation sounds pretty harmless, even if it is for ‘Unusual Happenstance’. That’s not usually a clause Normals use – it covers all-purpose hauntings, angry genii loci, ectoplasmic home invasion, demonic possession, that sort of thing – but Susan Beckett’s claimed three times in three months. Her house keeps getting inundated with mud, but she’s still insisting she doesn’t need or want help . . . until the dry-land drownings begin.

V’s first lead takes her to Chinatown, where she is confronted by kitsune assassins. But when she suddenly goes into labour, it’s clear the fox spirits are not going to be helpful…

I loved Angela Slatter’s first Verity Fassbinder novel Vigil. I adored its heroine, the setting and the world. But for some reason I didn’t get round to reading book two in the series, Corpselight, when it came out last year and I never got around to it. But with the third book, Restoration, having just been released, when I was asked to be part of the blog tour, I decided that it would be the perfect time to catch up. And I’ve been kicking myself ever since, because why did I deprive myself of such a fabulous read for a year?  Read More …

Snorri Kristjansson – Kin

Everyone loves a family reunion.

He can deny it all he likes, but everyone knows Viking warlord Unnthor Reginsson brought home a great chest of gold when he retired from the longboats and settled down with Hildigunnur in a remote valley. Now, in the summer of 970, adopted daughter Helga is awaiting the arrival of her unknown siblings: dark, dangerous Karl, lithe, clever Jorunn, gentle Aslak, henpecked by his shrewish wife, and the giant Bjorn, made bitter by Volund, his idiot son.

And they’re coming with darkness in their hearts.

The siblings gather, bad blood simmers and old feuds resurface as Unnthor’s heirs make their moves on the old man’s treasure – until one morning Helga is awakened by screams. Blood has been shed: kin has been slain.

No one confesses, but all the clues point to one person – who cannot possibly be the murderer, at least in Helga’s eyes. But if she’s going to save the innocent from the axe and prevent more bloodshed, she’s got to solve the mystery – fast . . .

Lies. Manipulation. Murder. There’s nothing quite like family . . .

Kin is the latest book by the wonderful Snorri Kristjansson. I adored his first two novels, Swords of Good Men and Blood Will Follow. So much so, that I haven’t finished the first series yet, since I don’t want to say goodbye to Ulfar and Audun, the protagonists of the Valhalla trilogy. I really do love Snorri and his writing though, so when Kin arrived I squealed. Because Viking crime? I became the embodiment of this gif:

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Sebastien de Castell – Tyrant’s Throne

Falcio Val Bond, First Cantor of the Greatcoats, is on the brink of fulfilling his dead King’s dream: Aline is about to take the throne and restore the rule of law once and for all.

But for the Greatcoats, nothing is ever that simple. In neighbouring Avares, an enigmatic new warlord is uniting the barbarian armies, and even worse, he is rumoured to have a new ally: Falcio’s old nemesis Trin. With the armies of Avares at her back, she’ll be unstoppable.

Falcio, Kest and Breast go racing north to stop her, but in those cold, treacherous climes they discover something altogether different, and far more dangerous: a new player has entered the game, and plans to take the throne of Tristia…

Just when you think that Falcio and his Greatcoats have finally achieved their goals, the past comes back to haunt them in the form of not just a former known foe, but new unexpected enemies as well. In the fourth book in The Greatcoats series, Tyrant’s Throne, Sebastien de Castell brings several elements of the previous book full circle. I really enjoyed the way that he pulled back in strands that had seemed resolved; the reappearance of some of them created a gloomy sense of inevitability for Falcio and friends, a despondency they needed to fight to overcome.  Read More …

Sebastien de Castell – Saint’s Blood

How do you kill a Saint?

Falcio, Kest and Brasti are about to find out, because even Tristia’s most powerful Saints are turning up dead and the entire country is convinced it’s a sign that the Gods themselves oppose Aline’s ascension to the throne.

Now the Dukes are using the murders as an excuse to weasel out of their agreement to reinstate the Greatcoats, providing a golden opportunity for the Inquisitors — the Church’s own duelling magistrates — to take up the burden of enforcing justice … their own much harsher form of justice.

If he’s going to stop the Inquisitors, Falcio has to find the Saint-killer.

The only clue is the terrifying iron mask encasing the head of the dying Saint of Mercy — but even if it does lead him to the murderer, Falcio will still have to face him in battle.

And this may be one duel that no swordsman, no matter how skilled, can ever hope to win.

After I finished the second book in The Greatcoats series, Knight’s Shadow, I couldn’t wait to dive into Saint’s Blood, because I needed to know what happened next. This third instalment in the series was just as exciting as the previous two and even more gut-wrenching emotionally. Falcio and friends are back and have to face yet more foes bent on keeping Aline from the throne.  Read More …

Sebastien de Castell – Knight’s Shadow

Tristia is a nation overcome by intrigue and corruption. The idealistic young King Paelis is dead and the Greatcoats — legendary travelling magistrates who brought justice to the Kingdom — have been branded traitors. But just before his head was impaled on a spike, the King swore each of his hundred and forty-four Greatcoats to individual missions.

Falcio Val Bond, First Cantor, with the help of fellow Greatcoats Kest and Brasti, has completed his King’s final task: he has found his Charoites — well, one at least, and she was not quite what they expected. Now they must protect the girl from the many who would see her dead, and place her on the throne of a lawless kingdom. That would be simple enough, if it weren’t for the Dashini, an equally legendary band of assassins, getting in their way, not to forget the Dukes, who are determined to hold on to their fractured duchies, or the fact that the heir to the throne is only thirteen years old. Oh, and the poison that is slowly killing Falcio.

That’s not even mentioning the Greatcoat’s Lament…

When Sebastien de Castell’s debut novel Traitor’s Blade came out, I fell in love with both the story and the style. It was a joyous book, yet dealing with serious issues. And who could resist the brotherhood between Falcio, Brasti, and Kest? When I finished the first book, my main complaint was that I couldn’t read the second one immediately. I waited a year and when Knight’s Shadow came out, it fell between the cracks of all the other review copies I had to read. And when the next book, Saint’s Blood came out last year, it suffered the same fate, since now I had to read two huge books to catch up. However, this year saw the publication of the final book in the The Greatcoats series, Tyrant’s Throne and I decided it was time to catch up. In the end, I don’t know whether to kick myself for not reading the books sooner or to be grateful to my past self, since I could now just read all of the story in one go. I’m still undecided on that point…  Read More …

Review Amnesty: Reprise

reviewamnestyIt’s the return of the review amnesty. Once again I’m behind on reviewing books I’ve read and I really want to get through this backlog, so I won’t just keep staring at it mournfully and then freeze up trying to write the reviews. So I’ve decided to to write another batch of shorter reviews and I might do another one in the near future, just so I can start fresh after the summer.  Read More …

Angela Slatter – Vigil

angelaslatter-vigilVerity Fassbinder has her feet in two worlds.

The daughter of one human and one Weyrd parent, she has very little power herself, but does claim unusual strength – and the ability to walk between us and the other – as a couple of her talents. As such a rarity, she is charged with keeping the peace between both races, and ensuring the Weyrd remain hidden from us.

But now Sirens are dying, illegal wine made from the tears of human children is for sale – and in the hands of those Weyrd who hold with the old ways – and someone has released an unknown and terrifyingly destructive force on the streets of Brisbane.

And Verity must investigate – or risk ancient forces carving our world apart.

Welcome to Brisneyland! The story Angela Slatter presents us with in her debut solo-novel Vigil is a departure from her previous work, which I have heard people raving about for the past few years really. As such it was the perfect place for me to start my first Angela Slatter story, since it is the beginning of a series and the start of this new urban fantasy direction for the author. And I loved it. Vigil is a fantastic read, with a heroine who captured my heart.  Read More …

Author Query – Angela Slatter

angelaslatter-vigilFor the past few years I’ve heard people rave about Angela Slatter’s writing and due to that I was familiar with her name. When Jo Fletcher Books announced they’d acquired two books by her in an urban fantasy series I was intrigued, as it was a departure from her dark fantasy and horror work. I read Vigil earlier this week and it was awesome—I may have a teensy book crush on Verity Fassbinder. I’ll be posting my review for the book later today, but for now here is an interview with Angela on Verity, the inspirations for Brisneyland, and whether a tourist could find their way to places in the book.  Read More …