Margrét Helgadóttir (ed.) – Asian Monsters

They lurk and crawl and fly in the shadows of our mind. We know them from ancient legends and tales whispered by the campfire. They hide under the dark bridge, in the deep woods or out on the great plains, in the drizzling rain forest or out on the foggy moor, beneath the surface, under your bed. They don’t sparkle or have any interest in us except to tear us apart. They are the monsters! Forgotten, unknown, misunderstood, overused, watered down. We adore them still. We want to give them a renaissance, to reestablish their dark reputation, to give them a comeback, let the world know of their real terror.

Asian Monsters is the third in a coffee table book series from Fox Spirit Books with dark fiction and art about monsters from around the world.

If myths and monster stories are universal and timeless, they are separated by place. Even if almost any civilisation has an overlap in the core nature of their monsters, each is rich in their variety often influenced by their environment. You can find dozens of iterations of vampiric entities and shape shifters, of the fey and the possessive. The one creature that appears across the globe in the same guise is the ghost. Be it a revenant, haunt, poltergeist or lingering spirit, be they malevolent or benign—ghosts are of all times and places. As such I found it striking that so many of the stories in Asian Monsters, edited by Margrét Helgadóttir, focused on these apparitions. If the monsters in African Monsters were largely bound by place, the monsters in this volume were bound by people.  Read More …

Editor Query – Margrét Helgadottir

I’m having a bit of a theme this week. yesterday I reviewed African Monsters, edited by Margrét Helgadottir and Jo Thomas, on Friday I plan to review the next instalment in the series Asian Monsters and today I have an interview with the editor of both anthologies Margrét Helgadottir. Margrét is a talented author in her own right, but I focused my questions on her work as an editor on Asian Monsters. I hope you enjoy the interview and check out both African and Asian MonstersRead More …

Margrét Helgadottir and Jo Thomas (eds) – African Monsters

They lurk and crawl and fly in the shadows of our mind. We know them from ancient legends and tales whispered by the campfire. They hide under the dark bridge, in the deep woods or out on the great plains, in the drizzling rain forest or out on the foggy moor, beneath the surface, under your bed. They don’t sparkle or have any interest in us except to tear us apart. They are the monsters! Forgotten, unknown, misunderstood, overused, watered down. We adore them still. We want to give them a renaissance, to reestablish their dark reputation, to give them a comeback, let the world know of their real terror.

African Monsters is the second in a coffee table book series from Fox Spirit Books with dark fiction and art about monsters from around the world.  Read More …

Editor Query – Margrét Helgadóttir and Jo Thomas

africanmonstersI love history, legends, myths, folklore, and fairy tales. As such I was surprised that I had completely missed the publication of European Monsters by Fox Spirit Books last year, when I learned about the imminent publication of the second book in that series, African Monsters. I was intrigued, so I asked its editors, Margrét Helgadóttir and Jo Thomas whether I could interview them about this latest instalment in the Book of Monsters series. Luckily they said yes, so here we are. African Monsters was published earlier this month and can be obtained from various retailers. I do hope you’ll check African Monsters out, because looking at its table of contents it is bound to be a collection well worth your time.  Read More …

Margrét Helgadóttir – The Stars Seem So Far Away

margrethelgadottir-thestarsseemsofarawayThe last shuttles to the space colonies are long gone. Wars, famine and plagues rage across the dying Earth. Fleeing the deadly sun, humans migrate farther and farther north. Follow the stories of five very different survivors as they cling to what is left of life in a future North.

Margrét Helgadóttir’s The Stars Seem So Far Away is a slim little volume, that packs quite a punch. A collection of interlinked short stories, this book tells the tales of five survivors of the Earth’s collapse. Humanity has slowly but surely exhausted the Earth’s resources and global warming has caused much of the world to become uninhabitable. Humanity has retreated to the North, though I assume that there will also be people who have gone to the opposite pole, but our focus is on the North. This isn’t surprising since Helgadóttir is of Scandinavian descent and in fact isn’t a native English speaker, hailing from Norway and currently residing in Denmark.  Read More …