Tag archives for Flux

Andrea Hannah – Of Scars and Stardust

andreahannah-ofscarsandstardustAfter the attack that leaves her little sister, Ella, close to death in a snowy cornfield, Claire Graham is sent to live with her aunt in Manhattan to cope. But the guilt of letting Ella walk home alone that night still torments Claire, and she senses the violence that preyed on her sister hiding around every corner. Her shrink calls it a phobia. Claire calls it the truth.

When Ella vanishes two years later, Claire has no choice but to return to Amble, Ohio, and face her shattered family. Her one comfort is Ella’s diary, left in a place where only Claire could find it. Drawing on a series of cryptic entries, Claire tries to uncover the truth behind Ella’s attack and disappearance. But she soon realizes that not all lost things are meant to be found.

Andrea Hannah’s Of Scars and Stardust was a compelling read, but also one that is hard to review. Saying too much might spoil Hannah’s careful build-up of the narrative and the story’s suspense, but at the same time it’s hard to talk about it without touching upon anything that might give hints about how the story ends. So, be warned, I’ll try to review the story without spoilers, but there might be some.   Continue reading »

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Christine Hurley Deriso – Thirty Sunsets

christinehurleyderiso-thirtysunsetsTo Forrest Shephard, getting away to the family’s beach house with her parents and her brother, Brian, is the best part of every summer. Until this year, when her mother invites Brian’s obnoxious girlfriend, Olivia, to join them. Suddenly, Forrest’s relaxing vacation becomes a mission to verify the reality of Olivia’s rumored eating disorder. But the truth behind Olivia’s finicky eating isn’t at all what Forrest expected. And over the next thirty days, Forrest’s world is turned upside down as her family’s darkest secrets begin to come to light.

When I saw Thirty Sunsets in the Flux catalogue and later on NetGalley, it sounded like it might be an interesting novel. But from the synopsis I’d expected a far different book than I got. That isn’t to say that this is a bad thing, but it was surprising. Note that this review will have spoilers as you can’t really talk meaningfully about this book without giving them. If you want to remain unspoiled for this book, best not continue on, because here be SPOILERS!   Continue reading »

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Anticipated Books (Summer-Fall) 2014: YA October-December

2014We’re almost there! Welcome to the penultimate post in my Anticipated Books series for the second half of 2014. Today I’m sharing the third and last part of my picks for books published for the YA crowd. For some of these I already have an (e)ARC or review copy, so they’ll definitely be read and reviewed. And for the rest, I’ll have to see whether I get the chance to get my hands on them! Continue reading »

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Anticipated Books (Summer-Fall) 2014: YA September

2014Welcome to the next post in my Anticipated Books series for the second half of 2014. YA books have become a big part of my reading diet. Some of my favourite authors are writing for this age group and there are just so many great titles out there. Consequently, I’ve had to spread my YA picks over three posts. This is the second one. For some of these I already have an (e)ARC or review copy, so they’ll definitely be read and reviewed. And for the rest, I’ll have to see whether I get the chance to get my hands on them!  Continue reading »

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Anticipated Books (Summer-Fall) 2014: YA July-August

2014Welcome to the next post in my Anticipated Books series for the second half of 2014. YA books have become a big part of my reading diet. Some of my favourite authors are writing for this age group and there are just so many great titles out there. Consequently, I’ve had to spread my YA picks over three posts. This is the first one. For some of these I already have an (e)ARC or review copy, so they’ll definitely be read and reviewed. And for the rest, I’ll have to see whether I get the chance to get my hands on them!  Continue reading »

By Published Posted in article, contemporary, crime, fantasy, horror, mystery, science fiction, thriller, YA | 2 Comments

Sarah Jamila Stevenson – The Truth Against the World

sarahjamilastevenson-thetruthagainsttheworldWhen Olwen Nia Evans learns that her family is moving from San Francisco to Wales to fulfil her great-grandmother’s dying wish, she starts having strange and vivid dreams about her family’s past. But nothing she sees in her dreams of the old country–the people, the places–makes any sense. Could it all be the result of an overactive imagination . . . or could everything she’s been told about her ancestors be a lie?

Once in Wales, she meets Gareth Lewis, a boy plagued by dreams of his own–visions he can’t shake after meeting a ghost among the misty cairns along the Welsh seaside.

A ghost named Olwen Nia Evans.

Sarah Jamila Stevenson’s The Truth Against the World is a modern-day Welsh ghost story that proves that ghosts can be from any era and bound to earth for any reason. It’s about the secrets people keep and how a coincidental discovery of a tombstone out at a deserted ruin at the seaside can unravel those secrets decades on. While the story Wyn and Gareth discover is tragic, their story itself is lovely and astonishingly free of insta-love and relationship drama. Instead the focus is squarely on Olwen and helping her find peace.  Continue reading »

By Published Posted in mystery, review, YA | 1 Comment

Kathryn Rose – Camelot Burning

kathrynrose-camelotburningEighteen-year-old Vivienne lives in a world of knights and ladies, corsets and absinthe, outlaw magic and alchemical machines. By day, she is lady-in-waiting to the future queen of Camelot—Guinevere. By night, she secretly toils away in the clock tower as apprentice to Merlin, the infamous recovering magic addict.

Then she meets Marcus, below her in class, destined to become a knight, and just as forbidden as her apprenticeship with Merlin. When Morgan La Fey, the king’s sorceress sister, declares war on Camelot, Merlin thinks they can create a metal beast powered by steam and alchemy to defeat her. But to save the kingdom, Vivienne will have to risk everything—her secret apprenticeship, her love for Marcus, and her own life.

I have a thing for Arthurian-inspired stories. I know they’ve been done to death, but the tragedy of its love story, the chivalry of the knights, the mix of history and magic have all fascinated me ever since I read Marion Zimmer Bradley’s The Mists of Avalon at fourteen. Kathryn Rose’s Camelot Burning spoke to my inner fourteen-year-old when I read the synopsis and not being overly familiar with steampunk outside of a Victorian setting, I was interested to see how it would work for me. Unfortunately, while I liked the twists to the Arthurian side of things that Rose incorporated, it took me a long while to get to grips with the steampunk elements in the story as they were just a little jarring at first.  Continue reading »

By Published Posted in fantasy, review, YA | 1 Comment

Helene Dunbar – These Gentle Wounds

helenedunbar-thesegentlewoundsFive years after an unspeakable tragedy that changed him forever, Gordie Allen has made a new home with his half-brother Kevin. Their arrangement works since Kevin is the only person who can protect Gordie at school and keep him focused on getting his life back on track.

But just when it seems like things are becoming normal, Gordie’s biological father comes back into the picture, demanding a place in his life. Now there’s nothing to stop Gordie from falling into a tailspin that could cost him everything—including his relationship with Sarah, the first girl he’s trusted with the truth. With his world spinning out of control, the only one who can help Gordie is himself … if he can find the strength to confront the past and take back his future.

We’ve all seen the news items or newspaper headlines detailing another family tragedy where one or both parents take the life of their children and themselves. Those stories always leave me shaken as I can’t imagine being so desperate that you take that final step and decide to take your children with you. And sometimes, just sometimes, the children miraculously survive. And I can’t even imagine what that must be like. But fifteen-year-old Gordie Allen does, because he did. These Gentle Wounds is his story, not of surviving, since he’s been doing that for five years, but of the long process of healing he has to go through. In her debut novel Helene Dunbar examines PTSD and how sometimes surviving and getting better are the hardest things there are.  Continue reading »

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Scott Tracey – Darkbound

scotttracey-darkboundNo one hates being a witch quite like Malcolm. But if there’s one thing worse than being a witch, it’s being a Moonset witch. There are very few things in his life that he can control, and after a fight with his siblings, he’s losing his grip on what he’s got left.

A creature as old as Hamelin has crept out of the Abyss, and its siren song has infected the teenagers of Carrow Mill compelling them, at first, to simply be swept away in love. But love soon turns dangerous, as passion turns to violence and an army of sociopaths is born.

The Pied Piper isn’t just a story, and he’s got his eyes set on Malcolm, promising a life of freedom from magic and the shackles of the Moonset bond. As Carrow Mill burns, Malcolm must make the hardest choice of his life: family? Or freedom?

In the sequel to last year’s Moonset, Scott Tracey returns the reader to Carrow Mill. However, we don’t return to Justin’s point of view, instead the story is told from Malcolm’s perspective. It’s an interesting shift, especially as it means we get a different look at the members of the Moonset coven, both past and present. While I enjoyed Darkbound quite a lot and it was a good follow-up to Moonset, there were some things that disappointed me and some troubling aspects to some of Tracey’s word choice and ambiguity as to Mal’s sexual orientation.  Continue reading »

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Anticipated Books (Winter-Spring) 2014: YA April-June

2014We’re almost there! Welcome to the penultimate post in my Anticipated Books series for the first half of 2014. Today I’m sharing the second half of my picks for books published for the YA crowd. For some of these I already have an (e)ARC or review copy, so they’ll definitely be read and reviewed. And for the rest, I’ll have to see whether I get the chance to get my hands on them!   Continue reading »

By Published Posted in article, contemporary, fantasy, historical fiction, horror, mystery, science fiction, YA | Leave a comment
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