Tag archives for 30 days of genre

30 Days of Genre: Day 30

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 30 – Your favourite genre novel of all time
Seriously? You still need to ask? It’s a Lackey, but it’s probably not the one you’re expecting; it’s Arrow’s Flight, the second book in the Heralds of Valdemar trilogy about Talia. This is the book where Talia truly has to come into her own. She has to deal with her gift gone rogue, but most importantly she has to deal with her own demons and insecurities. She manages to do so and comes out on top, but not without a lot of hard work and soul searching. For many reasons this book resonated with me when I was a teen, but also when I was in my twenties and now I’m in my thirties and the book still has a lot of meaning. In a very different way than when I was fifteen, but just as powerfully.

Well, that’s it! 30 days of genre wrapped up. That went by fast, but it was great fun, even though I’ve learned I’m not made to blog each and every day. I hope you enjoyed reading these posts as much as I enjoyed thinking about the questions!

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30 Days of Genre: Day 29

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 29 – A genre novel you thought you wouldn’t like, but ended up loving
I always believed I didn’t much like Science Fiction and would prefer to just read Fantasy. Then I became pregnant and most of my awake time was spent nauseous and later on unable to sit behind a pc after having worked all day. So I read, a lot, a whole lot. One day when I was looking for something to read, my husband gave me Marianne de Pierres’ Nylon Angel and said read this, you’ll like it. I looked at it and it was SF and also looked sort of cyberpunky, so I was dubious about me liking it. Wiebe insisted I try it, telling me I could always put it aside, if I didn’t like it. He knows me well enough to know I don’t easily put books away, so he actually tricked me. I still blame hormones for walking into that one. But even if it was hormones and a sneaky spouse that got me reading, I’m glad they did, because I absolutely adored Nylon Angel and went on to rip through Code Noir and Crash Deluxe. Nylon Angel taught me to be open to new reading experiences and not keep to books I think I might like based on previous reading experiences.

So have you ever got tricked into reading outside of your comfort zone?

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30 Days of Genre: Day 28

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 28 – Favourite publisher of genre novels
This choice is another really difficult one. A few years ago it would have been easy, but in the past year and a half I’ve discovered so many great publishers that I’m spoiled for choice! But, because I do have to make a choice, I’m going to go with Harper Voyager, previously Voyager Books, as when I started reading SFF, I used to look for their logo on the back of the books in the shop and usually found something good to read when I found one. They were my got-to publisher when I was fifteen and even today they publish a lot of my favourite authors, such as Raymond E. Feist, Robin Hobb and Blake Charlton.

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30 Days of Genre: Day 27

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 27 – Most epic scene ever
The most epic scene ever is always a temporary choice, because I never know what I might read next. But this scene that follows is my most epic scene for now. It has everything, tension, release, emotion and for me a bucket load of tears. It’s a scene from the final part of Steven Erikson’s Deadhouse Gates.

***Warning: If you haven’t read the book yet, this scene contains spoilers, you might not want to read on!***

     The bowstring thrummed. The long shaft cut through the sky.
‘Oh, gods!’ Squint moaned. ‘Too high – too high!’
It rose, swept through the massed crows untouched and unwavering, began arcing down.
Duiker could have sworn that Coltaine looked up then, lifted his gaze to greet that gift, as the iron head impacted his forehead, shattering the bone, sank deep into his brain and killed him instantly. His head snapped back between the spars of wood, then the arrow was through.
The warriors on the barrow’s slopes flinched back.
The crows shook the air with their eerie cries and plunged down towards the sagging figure on the cross, sweeping over the warriors crowding the slopes. The sorcery that battered at them was shunted aside, scattered by whatever force -Coltaine’s soul? – now rose to join the birds.
The cloud descended on Coltaine, swallowing him entire and covering the cross itself – at that distance they were to Duiker like flies swarming a piece of flesh.
And when they rose, exploding skyward, the warleader of the Crow Clan was gone.
~Steven Erikson – Deadhouse Gates

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30 Days of Genre: Day 26

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 26 – Best hero
Another brain-cooking choice! There are so many characters to chose from, so many types of hero’s. I’m going to go with an unconventional one, and one that I haven’t mentioned on the blog before. I’m picking Vetch (or, as he’s later known, Kiron) from the Dragon Jousters series by Mercedes Lackey (stop groaning! I can hear you in the back there!!) I’m choosing him, because through the series he runs the whole gamut of hero-states: the powerless slave boy, who by working hard rises to be a trusted dragon boy, and later on becomes one of the warrior leaders of his country, but goes on to create his own refuge away from war. He grows from a little boy into a man and does so in a way that made me love him more with each book. The Dragon Jouster books are great reads, the first time I read Joust, after I finished it, I returned to the first page to check something and found myself halfway through the first chapter again before I knew it! So if you haven’t read these books, go check them out, they’re well worth the time.

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30 Days of Genre: Day 25

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Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 25 – A genre novel you plan on reading soon
One of the novels I plan on reading soon is Peter F. Hamilton’s Misspent Youth. Originally bought so I could participate in a (re)read-along Amanda and Mark were planning last year, I’ll now just be reading it on my own. As stated before, I’m not that well-read in Science Fiction and not at all in space opera, having read mostly military SF so far. So reading Hamilton’s books (I’ve got Pandora’s Star and Judas Unchained waiting on my shelves as well) will be quite a challenge and an experience for me. Hopefully it’ll be one I enjoy!

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30 Days of Genre: Day 24

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 24 – Favourite classic genre novel
My favourite classic genre story has to be The Never-Ending Story by Michael Ende. I first read this as a child and loved it. In a post from last year in which I talked about five of my favourite children’s books when I was a child, I had this to say about The Never-Ending Story:

The Dutch translation of the enchanting Never-Ending Story by Michael Ende is one of my most treasured children’s books. Apart from the wonderful story of the little boy that finds his courage and sense of self in the world of Fantasia, this edition is just deliciously designed. The parts which take place in the ‘real world’ are printed in red, while the scenes set in Fantasia are printed in blue. At the beginning of each chapter, starts with the next letter in the alphabet, there is an illustration, an illuminated capital. Together with the wonderfully engrossing story of Balthasar it makes for an awesome reading experience. As a child I identified a lot with Balthasar and his wish to escape the bullies and losing himself in a book, since being bullied myself, that was exactly what I tried to do every day after school. I adored Atreyu and Falkor and my favourite cuddley toy, a stuffed dog, always became Falkor for the duration of the reading of the book. Though his real name was (and is) Sebastian for the dog that Alex, the protagonist of the next book owned.

This book is not just a gorgeous fantasy story, it also embodies the magic experience that reading can be, which is why I love it to bits.

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30 Days of Genre: Day 23

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 23 – Genre novel you haven’t read, but wish you had
The one genre novel I wish I’d read, but haven’t (yet) is China Miéville’s Perdido Street Station. China Miéville is one of the big names in modern fantasy these days and to my shame I have to admit I’ve only read one of his books, the much lauded and awarded The City & the City. I really liked it, I thought it was clever, an interesting premise and an intriguing murder mystery. I concluded my review by stating that I wanted to read more by Miéville and that he’d become a must-read author, so I guess I’d better get cracking. Embassytown was released last month and I still have to read all his previous works!

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30 Days of Genre: Day 22

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 22 – A sequel which disappointed you
A sequel that disappointed me was Sherwood Smith’s The Fox, the second book in her Inda quartet. It wasn’t that it was a bad book, because it really wasn’t, but I loved the first book Inda (Goodreads review) and while The Fox took up where Inda left off and had some awesome things going for it, (I mean there are pirates, real honest to god pirates, what’s not to love?) in the end it didn’t leave as big and lasting an impression as Inda did. As a result it’s been two years since I read it and I still haven’t picked up the last two books in the sequence. Every time I put them in my shopping basket, I end up taking them out and letting other books take precedence. For me that’s rare, as usually when I start a series I want to finish it. I know that at some point I’ll get to it, I just don’t know when and reading back my review for Inda, that’s a shame, because this series had a lot of promise.

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30 Days of Genre: Day 21

Ria, over on Bibliotropic has started a new meme in which we discuss thirty topics on genre in thirty days. For a full list of topics covered, see my first post on this meme.

Day 21 – Genre novel with the most interesting character interactions
I’m going to go the completely unexpected direction and say Sam Sykes’ Tome of the Undergates. I love the way his characters interact. They seem to hate each other with a passion, but there is a lot more to it than that, which Sykes shows in tantalizing flashes, rather than telling us. Whether it’s the weird love-hate relationship between Lenk and Kataria or the strange feelings Asper seems to have for Dreadalon or even that Denaos isn’t so self-involved and cowardly as he likes to think. All of this is combined with a high dose of snark and snipping, which had me snorting with laughter several times. I can’t wait till Black Halo is released in the UK to see how these characters develop and what they get up to next.

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