Josiah Bancroft – Senlin Ascends

Mild-mannered headmaster Thomas Senlin prefers his adventures to be safely contained within the pages of a book. So when he loses his new bride shortly after embarking on the honeymoon of their dreams, he is ill-prepared for the trouble that follows.

To find her, Senlin must enter the Tower of Babel — a world of geniuses and tyrants, of menace and wonder, of unusual animals and mysterious machines. He must endure betrayal, assassination attempts and the long guns of a flying fortress. And if he hopes to ever see his wife again, he will have to do more than just survive — this quiet man of letters must become a man of action.

I went on somewhat of a journey with Josiah Bancroft’s Senlin Ascends. When I first read the description on the back of the book, my immediate reaction was: “Oh, I hope this isn’t another case of a fridged partner.” Because ugh — but it sounded really cool, so I decided to give it a try anyway. And while Marya disappears, which is Senlin’s motivation to progress up the Tower, she is no damsel, from the glimpses we have of her, has agency of her own and hopefully become an active character in her own right in future books. And in the end, I’m glad I took that chance, because I had a great time with it.  Read More …

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Amy Alward – The Potion Diaries

Wiebe is back with another review.

When the princess of Nova accidentally poisons herself with a love potion meant for her crush, she falls crown-over-heels in love with her own reflection. Oops. A nationwide hunt is called to find the cure, with competitors traveling the world for the rarest ingredients, deep in magical forests and frozen tundras, facing death at every turn.

Enter Samantha Kemi – an ordinary girl with an extraordinary talent. Sam’s family were once the most respected alchemists in the kingdom, but they have fallen on hard times, and winning the hunt would save their reputation. But can Sam really compete with the dazzling powers of the ZoroAster megapharma company? And just how close is she willing to get to Zain Aster, her dashing enemy, in the meantime.

Just to add to the pressure, this quest is all over social media. And the world news.

No big deal then.

Reading the text on the back cover of The Potion Diaries, Amy Alward sets herself a lot of goals in this book. A quest, a love story, a family mystery and social media, set in a yet to be explained fantasy world. All that in a fast paced YA-ish novel of 350 pages. Looking back on the novel, I think it was a bit too much. I could shoot holes in the plot, say why I find the world is not fleshed out enough and much more. It is in my opinion a gross underestimation of the readers’ age makes that it makes you think you can get away with that. But it is YA, so long as it invokes stormy emotions and makes me feel 16 again, I will go along with it.  Read More …

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Snorri Kristjansson – Kin

Everyone loves a family reunion.

He can deny it all he likes, but everyone knows Viking warlord Unnthor Reginsson brought home a great chest of gold when he retired from the longboats and settled down with Hildigunnur in a remote valley. Now, in the summer of 970, adopted daughter Helga is awaiting the arrival of her unknown siblings: dark, dangerous Karl, lithe, clever Jorunn, gentle Aslak, henpecked by his shrewish wife, and the giant Bjorn, made bitter by Volund, his idiot son.

And they’re coming with darkness in their hearts.

The siblings gather, bad blood simmers and old feuds resurface as Unnthor’s heirs make their moves on the old man’s treasure – until one morning Helga is awakened by screams. Blood has been shed: kin has been slain.

No one confesses, but all the clues point to one person – who cannot possibly be the murderer, at least in Helga’s eyes. But if she’s going to save the innocent from the axe and prevent more bloodshed, she’s got to solve the mystery – fast . . .

Lies. Manipulation. Murder. There’s nothing quite like family . . .

Kin is the latest book by the wonderful Snorri Kristjansson. I adored his first two novels, Swords of Good Men and Blood Will Follow. So much so, that I haven’t finished the first series yet, since I don’t want to say goodbye to Ulfar and Audun, the protagonists of the Valhalla trilogy. I really do love Snorri and his writing though, so when Kin arrived I squealed. Because Viking crime? I became the embodiment of this gif:

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The Librarian’s Cat

Every library needs a cat and we just lost ours.

In early fall 2002, I didn’t yet work in a library and my library at home was significantly smaller, but I did get the first element of a true library: my own library cat. This small, orange creature, who was scared of even his shadow, spent his first few months hiding under the desk of my student room. He was small and nervous and very, very fluffy, so we decided to him call him Elmo. It took a while, but after a week or two of mainly hearing him scuffling around at night, he finally came out of his hiding place and made it to the sofa.  Read More …

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Nancy K. Wallace – Before Winter

As rumors of Devin’s death at his own bodyguard’s hands reach the capital, the Chancellor is detained on fabricated charges of treason, which may cost him his life. In the provinces, there are signs of people fighting to reclaim their history – but the forces against them are powerful: eradicating the Chronicles, and spreading darkness and death. 

Accompanied by a wolf pack and a retinue of their closest allies, Gaspard and Chastel must cross the mountains in a desperate attempt to save the Chancellor before winter makes their passage impossible. But the closer they journey towards Coreé, the clearer it becomes that there are those who don’t intend for them to arrive at all. 

Nancy K. Wallace’s The Wolves of Llisé series has gained a resonance with current affairs that Wallace perhaps hadn’t expected at the time when she started the story. Its central themes — showing that information is power, (mis)information is a tool, and truth is malleable — are eerily relevant today. Wallace also shows that there is a subversive power to storytelling, one we should cherish and not fear to wield. With Before Winter Wallace brings this trilogy (the previous books were Among Wolves and Grim Tidings) to a close and she does so with panache.  Read More …

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Debbie Johnson – Dark Vision

Wiebe is back with another review, this time for Debbie Johnson’s Dark Vision

Lilly McCain is cursed.

With just one touch she can see a person’s future, wether it’s a good fortune or a terrible fate. Afraid of the potent visions she forsees, she distances herself from the world, succumbing to a life of solitude.

But at the touch of a mysterious stranger — who has powers of his own – Lily sees a new chilling future for herself: one where she is fated to make a terrible choice…

Looking at the cover of Dark Vision, we see a lightning-torn sky and a slightly blurred Royal Liver Building and the back of a woman. Combined with the text on the back cover I could kinda guess what this book is going to be about. Girl finds out about a magical world and hijinx ensue. It will probably involve a handsome hunk and resistance to his attractiveness. The only question is if Debbie Johnson manages to keep it above the level of a harlequin novel. I still picked it out of our box of shame, cause that kind of book is a bit of guilty pleasure for me.  Read More …

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Fonda Lee – Jade City

Jade is the lifeblood of the city of Janloon – a stone that enhances a warrior’s natural strength and speed. It is mined, traded, stolen and killed for, all controlled by the ruthless No Peak and Mountain families. When a modern drug emerges that allows anyone — even foreigners — to wield jade, simmering tension between the two families erupts into clan war. 

A modern, secondary world fantasy novel is not something I’ve run across before as far as I can remember. Usually fantasy in a modern setting is set in our own world — with a twist, obviously — but it is certainly, recognisably our own and quite often shelved under urban fantasy. And while Fonda Lee’s Jade City is certainly urban and fantasy, it isn’t what you’d expect when picking up a novel that has been categorised as such. It is a novel that combines intrigue, politics, action, and drama in a setting that feels East Asia-inspired. In short, it was literal catnip to me.  Read More …

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Andrew Lane & Nigel Foster – Netherspace

This is another Wiebe review!

First contact is only the beginning…

Contact with aliens was made fourty years  ago, but communication turned out to be impossible. Humans don’t share a way of thinking with with any of the alien species, let alone a grammar. But there is trade, trade that produces scientific advances that would have taken thousands of years.

Earth may be a better place but it is no longer our own. We may be colonizing the stars, but we’re dependent on inexplicable alien netherspace drives, and they come at a heavy cost: live humans. When a group of colonists are captured by Cancri aliens, a human mission is sent to negotiate their releasse. But how can you negotiate when you don’t know what your target wants or why they took your people in the first place?

For my next read I semi-randomly picked Netherspace by Andrew Lane and Nigel Foster out of our many boxes of too-read-books. Our bookcases are coming next Monday (Editor’s Note: This review was written on November 16, the bookcases are standing right now). I had to put this book down after reading 130-some pages, as I was starting to hate-read this book. I know I am a very particular and unforgiving reader. Anytime the setting or the writing style takes me out of the story to go “wtf!” it detracts from my reading experience. This book did this too often and I just had to put it down.  Read More …

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Chris Brookmyre – Places in the Darkness

As announced previously, my husband Wiebe is going to be contributing reviews more regularly. Chris Brookmyre’s Places in the Darkness is his first review on A Fantastical Librarian in a while.

This is as close to a city without crime as mankind has ever seen.

Ciudad de cielo is the city in the sky, a space station where hundreds of scientists and engineers work in earth orbit, building the colony ship that will one day take humanity to the stars.

When a mutilated body is found on the CdC, the eyes of the world are watching. Top-of-the-class investigator Alice Blake, is sent from earth to team up with CdC’s Freeman – a jaded cop with more reason than most to distrust such planetside interference.

As the death toll climbs and factions aboard the station become more and more fractious, Freeman and Blake will discover clues to a conspiracy that threatens not only their own lives but the future of humanity itself.

Based on the copy on the back of the book, I judged Places in the Darkness to be a detective novel set in space. From the rest of the cover I saw that this is not the first crime novel Chis Brookmyre has written. Writing crime in a completely fictional stetting is a hard thing to do. Not only do you have all the elements for your crime, you also have to explain the universe the story is set in. You need to split your focus and risk not doing a good job on one or both of these elements.  Read More …

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UPDATED: Julie Czerneda Giveaway Winner

Cover art by Matthew Stawicki

UPDATE: VegasLass let me know she already had a copy and requested I select a new winner. So congratulations to

Guy Stewart!

With apologies for taking so long, I finally have a winner for the Czerneda giveaway:

VegasLass

I hope you’ll enjoy the book!

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