Author Query – Laure Eve

laureeve-theillusionistsLaure Eve is a YA author I’ve been following on Twitter for ages. Last year she published her debut novel Fearsome Dreamer, a dystopian, romantic technofantasy, which I reviewed on the blog last month. Laure is a wonderful and funny person and I was fortunate enough to meet her at WFC last year. Today Fearsome Dreamer‘s sequel The Illusionists is published and I thought that would be a great excuse to ask her some questions in an Author Query. Check back for a review for The Illusionists next week.

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Tom Pollock – Our Lady of the Streets

tompollock-ourladyofthestreetsFour months ago, Mater Viae, the Goddess of London, returned from London-Under-Glass to reclaim her throne. And ever since then, London has been dying.

Streets are wracked by convulsions as muscles of wire and pipe go into spasm, bunching the city into a crippled new geography; pavements flare to thousand-degree fevers, incinerating anyone and anything touching them. Towers crash to the ground, their foundations decayed.

As the streets sicken, so does Beth, drawn ever deeper into the heart of the city, while Pen fights desperately for a way to save her. But when they discover that Mater Viae’s plans for dominion stretch far beyond London’s borders, they must make a choice: Beth has it within her to unleash the city’s oldest and greatest powers – powers that could challenge the vengeful goddess, or destroy the city itself.

All good things must come to an end, so it was inevitable that Tom Pollock’s debut series would end too. After the fantastic The City’s Son and the equally wonderful The Glass Republic, this final instalment in the trilogy Our Lady of the Streets came with high expectations and had to meet a high standard to equal its predecessors. Happily, Our Lady of the Streets is even better than the previous books. It takes Beth, Pen, and all their allies on a wild ride trying to save the city they love and their own lives in the process. Since this is book three in a series it’s hard to review it without giving any spoilers for the previous books. I’m keeping them to a minimum, but you have been warned.   Continue reading »

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Pierre Ouellette – The Forever Man [Blog Tour]

pierreouellette-theforevermanPortland, Oregon, was once a beacon of promise and prosperity. Now it’s the epicenter of a world gone wrong, its streets overrun by victims and hustlers, drifters and gangsters. Lowly contract cop Lane Anslow struggles to keep afloat—and to watch out for his brilliant but bipolar brother, Johnny, a medical researcher. Lane soon discovers that Johnny is part of an experiment veiled in extraordinary secrecy. But he has no idea who’s behind it, how astronomical the stakes are, or how many lives might be destroyed to make it a reality.

Now Johnny’s gone missing. To find him, Lane follows a twisting trail into a billionaire’s hilltop urban fortress, a politician’s inner circle, a prison set in an aircraft graveyard, and a highly guarded community where people appear to be half their biological age. Hunted by dueling enemies, Lane meets a beautiful and enigmatic woman at the center of a vast web of political and criminal intrigue. And behind it all is a sinister, desperate race to claim the biggest scientific prize of all: eternal life.

From its synopsis The Forever Man sounded like an interesting near-future SF thriller and it was. Pierre Ouellette’s latest novel from Random House Alibi was an interesting story, with some original world building and a sympathetic main character. Yet while I enjoyed reading the book, I had a number of problems with it that made the book less compelling than it could have been.   Continue reading »

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Elizabeth Fremantle – Sisters of Treason

elizabethfremantle-sistersoftreasonMary Tudor clings fearfully to the English throne.

Seeing the threat posed by her cousin, Lady Jane Grey, the Queen orders her execution. But what of Lady Jane’s young sisters – Katherine and Mary? Cursed with royal blood, they must endure the perils of a Tudor court, closely observed by its paranoid Queen.

Entranced by the drama, intrigue and romance of court life, young Lady Katherine’s desire for love leads her to make ill-advised and dangerous liaisons. Burdened with a crooked back, her younger sister, Lady Mary – the ‘mouse’ – is seen as no threat and becomes privy to the Queen’s most intimate secrets. Yet Mary, who yearns to escape court dramas, knows her closeness to the Queen could be her undoing.

For the Queen is childless and in ill-health. If she should die, her fearsome sister Elizabeth will inherit the crown. Then Katherine and Mary will find court a maze of treachery and danger – where possessing royal blood is the gravest crime of all . . .

Elizabeth Fremantle writes historical fiction set in the Tudor era. In a market where one would expect every aspect of this family’s turbulent reign to have been mined to exhaustion, Fremantle approaches it through avenues that have been lightly travelled, if not missed entirely. In her first book, Queen’s Gambit, she focused on Henry VIII’s often overlooked last wife Katherine Parr and in her second novel, she focused on the similarly neglected Grey sisters. Having read Karleen Bradford’s The Nine Days Queen in the Dutch translation when I was about ten or eleven, Jane Grey has always fascinated me. When I saw the synopsis for Fremantle’s Sisters of Treason, the story of Jane’s younger sisters, I knew I had to read this book. Katherine and Mary Grey make for compelling leading ladies and the book was a fantastic read.   Continue reading »

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Recaps and Upfronts – July and August

RecapsTo kick off with the blog’s big news for last month: I was nominated for a World Fantasy Award for my work on A Fantastical Librarian! It remains a bit unreal, but needless to say I’m over the moon about it. It was also a perfect early birthday present for the blog, which turned four. I also went off-schedule a bit after deciding early on in the month that I was just going to read what I felt like in the moment this summer instead of following my rigidly structured reading list. Which is both oddly liberating and fear-inducing and I’ve found myself sneakily making mental lists of what to read next. I don’t know whether this should be cause for alarm or not!   Continue reading »

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Susan Spann – Blade of the Samurai [Blog Tour]

susanspann.bladeofthesamuraiJune, 1565: When a killer murders the shogun’s cousin, master ninja Hiro Hattori and Portuguese Jesuit Father Mateo are summoned to the shogun’s palace and ordered to find the killer. The evidence implicates Hiro’s friend and fellow shinobi, Kazu, who was working undercover at the shogunate; however, the victim’s wife, a suspicious maid, and even the shogun’s stable master also had reasons to want the victim dead.

The investigation reveals a plot to assassinate the shogun and depose the ruling Ashikaga clan. With enemy forces approaching Kyoto, and the murderer poised to strike again, Hiro and Father Mateo must produce the killer in time . . . or die in his place. Blade of the Samurai is a complex mystery that will transport readers to a thrilling and unforgettable adventure in sixteenth-century Japan.

I first became aware of Susan Spann when I came across her first novel Claws of the Cat last year. It immediately pinged a lot of the alerts on my radar: historical fiction, a murder mystery and an interesting setting in feudal Japan. Unfortunately I never came across the book, so I missed out on picking it up, but when I was approached about reviewing the second one I knew I had to say yes. For those of you who like me haven’t read the previous book: don’t worry Blade of the Samurai stands alone beautifully and makes for a very satisfying read.   Continue reading »

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Guy Adams – The Clown Service

guyadams-theclownserviceToby Greene has been reassigned.

After one screw up too many, he finds himself at a largely forgotten branch of the British Intelligence Service, working for August Shining, a Cold War relic, and charged with defending the country from paranormal terrorism.

But when an ex-Soviet-era enemy returns with an insidious plan to raise the dead and destroy London, it seems Toby’s impossible job is to save Great Britain – whether he believes it or not.

When The Clown Service arrived the cover grabbed me as it was seemingly so at odds with the title. It evokes a classic cold war spy thriller, but in a colourful way. It is also set in a supernatural London; that fact alone would have sold me. But it was not just the supernatural London setting that made this book so much fun, it was its tone and sense of humour as well. In addition, The Clown Service’s plot was extremely entertaining and very well put together. I was really pleased with the book and while the story was impeccably paced, I would have loved for it to have been a bit longer, so I could have spent just a bit more time with the characters.   Continue reading »

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Laure Eve – Fearsome Dreamer

laureeve-fearsomedreamerIn the world of FEARSOME DREAMER, England has become Angle Tar – a technophobic and fiercely independent country holding its own against the mass of other nations that is World. Rue is an apprenticed hedge witch in rural Angle Tar, but she knows she is destined for greater things. After being whisked off to the city by the enigmatic Frith, Rue becomes the student of White, a young Worlder with a Talent that is much in demand: White is no ordinary Dreamer – but then neither is Rue. Both can physically ‘jump’ to different places when they dream – and both have more power than they know.

Rue and White find themselves electrically attracted to each other – but who is the mysterious silver-eyed boy stalking Rue’s dreams? And why is he so interested in her relationship with White? Is Rue about to discover just how devastatingly real dreams can be…?

Fearsome Dreamer has been on my radar ever since I first learned it was to be published. I was lucky enough to grab a copy and get it signed by its author, Laure Eve, at WFC in Brighton last year, but as so many books that I got at WFC it landed on my TBR-pile, to remain there until this month. With the sequel The Illusionists out next month, I decided it was high time to finally read Fearsome Dreamer. And I’m glad I did. While Eve’s debut novel wasn’t perfect, its world-building was intriguing and its characters satisfyingly complex.  Continue reading »

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Craig Cormick – The Shadow Master

craigcormick-theshadowmasterIn a land riven with plague, in the infamous Walled City, two families vie for control – the Medicis with their genius inventor Leonardo; the Lorraines with Galileo, the most brilliant alchemist of his generation.

And when two star-crossed lovers, one from either house, threaten the status quo, a third, shadowy power – one that forever seems a step ahead of all of the familial warring – plots and schemes, and bides its time, ready for the moment to attack…

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Deborah Harkness – The Book of Life

deborahharkness-thebookoflifeA world of witches, daemons and vampires. A manuscript which holds the secrets of their past and the key to their future. Diana and Matthew – the forbidden love at the heart of it.

After travelling through time in SHADOW OF NIGHT, the second book in Deborah Harkness’s enchanting series, historian and witch Diana Bishop and vampire scientist Matthew Clairmont return to the present to face new crises and old enemies. At Matthew’s ancestral home in France they reunite with their families – with one heart-breaking exception. But the real threat to their future is yet to be revealed, and when it is, the search for the elusive manuscript Ashmole 782 and its missing pages takes on a terrifying urgency. Using ancient knowledge and modern science, from the palaces of Venice and beyond, Diana and Matthew will finally learn what the witches discovered so many centuries ago.

I was surprisingly blown away by the first book in this series and its sequel drew me in even further. Yet A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night were two very different books. Where A Discovery of Witches was modern day supernatural fantasy, Shadow of Night was very much a historical fantasy. And I was looking forward to seeing what The Book of Life would be. As far as setting goes, The Book of Life is very much more in the vein of A Discovery of Witches, yet with the added benefit of some of the fantastic characters from Shadow of Night. Yet like both of its predecessor the book makes for addictive reading and I had a serious case of book hangover once I finished it.

Of a necessity, talking about The Book of Life will contain some spoilers for the previous books, so if you want to remain unspoiled, beyond the cut will be SPOILERS!   Continue reading »

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