Peter Newman – The Malice

In the south, the Breach stirs.

Gamma’s sword, the Malice, wakes, calling to be taken to battle once more.

But the Vagrant has found a home now, made a life and so he turns his back, ignoring its call.

The sword cries out, frustrated, until another answers.

Her name is Vesper.

The Malice is the sequel to Peter Newman’s 2015 debut The Vagrant, which I absolutely loved. It made me coin the term lyrical grim, a description I still stand by, and it set the bar high for this sequel. A height the book easily clears, as it is a wonderful read, featuring more of Newman’s lovely prose style. The Malice takes the reader forward in time about a decade and presents them with an entirely new set of main characters, relegating the ones from The Vagrant somewhat to the background.  Read More …

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Peter Newman – The Hammer and the Goat

This novelette is set parallel to events in THE VAGRANT and tells the story of what the Hammer that Walks and the goat get up to when left to their own devices…

When I read Peter Newman’s debut The Vagrant two years ago, I completely fell in love with the Goat. The other characters were great, the story was wonderful, the writing style fabulous, but the goat was what won my heart. Thus a story featuring Goat and the amazing the Hammer that Walks as well, was an immediate buy.  Read More …

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Service announcement

Hello there! This is just a quick update to let you know that posting might be spotty in the near future. We’re currently in the middle of remodelling our home and my downstairs currently looks like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And while it is exciting to make the house completely our own, not to mention the fact that I’m getting my own personal library, it is also not very conducive to quiet weekends where I can sit down and write reviews. As such, I’ll be trying to keep to my weekly Monday post, but as the past two weeks have borne out, that might not always be in the charts.

However, this week I’ll be making up for the past two with not one, but four reviews. I’m having a bit of a Peter Newman theme week, reviewing not just his latest book, The Seven on Thursday, but reviewing the second book in the series, The Malice, and the novelette and novella he published in-between as well. After that, we’ll see!

As ever thanks for reading and I hope you enjoy this week’s posts.

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Author Query – Suellen Dainty [Blog Tour]

Today, I’m pleased to be able to bring you an interview with Suellen Dainty as part of her blog tour for her latest novel The Housekeeper, which was published in early March. When I read the blurb for the book, I was immediately intrigued by the concept and curious about the inspirations behind it. Suellen was kind enough to answer my questions in detail. This is just the third stop of the tour, so be sure to check out the other stops as well, you can find the schedule at the bottom of the post.

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Let’s start with the basics. Who is Suellen Dainty?

Most importantly, I’m the mother of two children, both adults now but still children to me.

I used to be a television producer and journalist, but as the years rolled on, I became less interested in writing about what other people did and more interested in writing something for myself. Read More …

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Amy Engel – The Roanoke Girls

After her mother’s suicide, fifteen year-old Lane Roanoke came to live with her grandparents and fireball cousin, Allegra, on their vast estate in rural Kansas. Lane knew little of her mother’s mysterious family, but she quickly embraced life as one of the rich and beautiful Roanoke girls. But when she discovered the dark truth at the heart of the family, she ran fast and far away.

Eleven years later, Lane is adrift in Los Angeles when her grandfather calls to tell her Allegra has gone missing. Did she run too? Or something worse? Unable to resist his pleas, Lane returns to help search, and to ease her guilt at having left Allegra behind. Her homecoming may mean a second chance with the boyfriend whose heart she broke that long ago summer. But it also means facing the devastating secret that made her flee, one she may not be strong enough to run from again.

As it weaves between Lane’s first Roanoke summer and her return, The Roanoke Girls shocks and tantalizes, twisting its way through revelation after mesmerizing revelation, exploring the secrets families keep and the fierce and terrible love that both binds them together and rips them apart.

Before I actually start this review and discuss Amy Engel’s The Roanoke Girls and my feelings about it, I want to give a content warning. Since it might be considered a spoiler, I’ve decided to put it in a footnote, so you can avoid it if you want.1 But in short, this book might be triggering to some, so Caveat Lector!  Read More …

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Author Query – Claire North

Claire North has received huge accolades for her first two novels under that name — I say that name as it is an open secret that it is a pseudonym for Catherine Webb aka Kate Griffin — her third novel The Sudden Appearance of Hope was just released in paperback and her fourth novel The End of the Day is out this April. So no time like the present to have her over on A Fantastical Librarian for an Author Query. I very much enjoyed this interview and Claire’s answer for how she shelves her books is one of my favourite ones I’ve received yet. My next goal is my own book nook! I hope you enjoy the interview just as much as I did. And look for reviews of Claire’s books here on the blog in the near future.  Read More …

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Emma Newman – After Atlas

Gov-corp detective Carlos Moreno was only a baby when Atlas left Earth to seek truth among the stars. But in that moment, the course of Carlos’s entire life changed. Atlas is what took his mother away, what made his father lose hope, what led Alejandro Casales, leader of the religious cult known as the Circle, to his door. And now, on the eve of the fortieth anniversary of Atlas’s departure, it’s got something to do with why Casales was found dead in his hotel room—and why Carlos is the man in charge of the investigation.

To figure out who killed one of the most powerful men on Earth, Carlos is supposed to put aside his personal history. But the deeper he delves into the case, the more he realises that escaping the past isn’t so easy. There is more to Casales’s death than meets the eye, and something much more sinister to the legacy of Atlas than anyone realises…

Let’s not bury the lede here: Emma Newman’s After Atlas is brilliant, you should all read it and I nominated it for a Hugo. Done. Everyone can go about their day. Or you can read on and find out why I loved this book so much.  Read More …

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Margrét Helgadóttir (ed.) – Asian Monsters

They lurk and crawl and fly in the shadows of our mind. We know them from ancient legends and tales whispered by the campfire. They hide under the dark bridge, in the deep woods or out on the great plains, in the drizzling rain forest or out on the foggy moor, beneath the surface, under your bed. They don’t sparkle or have any interest in us except to tear us apart. They are the monsters! Forgotten, unknown, misunderstood, overused, watered down. We adore them still. We want to give them a renaissance, to reestablish their dark reputation, to give them a comeback, let the world know of their real terror.

Asian Monsters is the third in a coffee table book series from Fox Spirit Books with dark fiction and art about monsters from around the world.

If myths and monster stories are universal and timeless, they are separated by place. Even if almost any civilisation has an overlap in the core nature of their monsters, each is rich in their variety often influenced by their environment. You can find dozens of iterations of vampiric entities and shape shifters, of the fey and the possessive. The one creature that appears across the globe in the same guise is the ghost. Be it a revenant, haunt, poltergeist or lingering spirit, be they malevolent or benign—ghosts are of all times and places. As such I found it striking that so many of the stories in Asian Monsters, edited by Margrét Helgadóttir, focused on these apparitions. If the monsters in African Monsters were largely bound by place, the monsters in this volume were bound by people.  Read More …

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Editor Query – Margrét Helgadottir

I’m having a bit of a theme this week. yesterday I reviewed African Monsters, edited by Margrét Helgadottir and Jo Thomas, on Friday I plan to review the next instalment in the series Asian Monsters and today I have an interview with the editor of both anthologies Margrét Helgadottir. Margrét is a talented author in her own right, but I focused my questions on her work as an editor on Asian Monsters. I hope you enjoy the interview and check out both African and Asian MonstersRead More …

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Margrét Helgadottir and Jo Thomas (eds) – African Monsters

They lurk and crawl and fly in the shadows of our mind. We know them from ancient legends and tales whispered by the campfire. They hide under the dark bridge, in the deep woods or out on the great plains, in the drizzling rain forest or out on the foggy moor, beneath the surface, under your bed. They don’t sparkle or have any interest in us except to tear us apart. They are the monsters! Forgotten, unknown, misunderstood, overused, watered down. We adore them still. We want to give them a renaissance, to reestablish their dark reputation, to give them a comeback, let the world know of their real terror.

African Monsters is the second in a coffee table book series from Fox Spirit Books with dark fiction and art about monsters from around the world.  Read More …

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