N.D. Gomes – Dear Charlie

ndgomes-dearcharlieEngland, 1996.
Death should never meet the young. But it did. Thanks to my brother, death made fourteen new friends that day. Maybe even fifteen, if you count Charlie.

At sixteen, Sam Macmillan is supposed to be thinking about girls, homework and his upcoming application to music college, not picking up the pieces after the school shooting that his brother Charlie committed. Yet as Sam desperately tries to hang on to the memories he has of his brother, the media storm surrounding their family threatens to destroy everything. And Sam has to question all he thought he knew about life, death, right and wrong.

School shootings are a sad phenomenon of our time and have been the subject of numerous YA novels in the past years. I’ve read two of those, Matthew Quick’s Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock and Marieke Nijkamp’s This is Where It Ends. Both are gripping, emotional novels, each dealing with different points of view on the matter. Quick’s book is written from the point of view of the shooter, while Nijkamp’s novel shows us differing perspectives of teens involved in a school shooting. Dear Charlie takes a very different tack, though its story is equally compelling and emotional. N.D. Gomes focuses her novel on the aftermath of a school shooting and what happens to the family of the culprit.  Read More …

Author Query – Jamison Stone

stone-runeoftheapprentice-6x9-cv-ft_hiresJamison Stone’s Rune of the Apprentice sounds like a book I’d very much enjoy  — and I one day plan to — but since I’m already terribly behind on my reading, I asked Jamison whether he’d be willing to answer some questions about the book and his writing. Luckily, he said yes, so here we are. Hopefully you’ll enjoy his answers as much as I did and check out Rune of the Apprentice!

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Let’s start with the basics. Who is Jamison Stone? 

Hello everyone! I was born in Massachusetts and raised throughout New England on a healthy diet of magic, martial arts, and meditation. I live with my loving wife and wolf, but expect to have our pack grow soon. When I am not getting distracted by video games, I am the director of Apotheosis Studios. Rune of the Apprentice is my first novel, however, there are more on the way.  Read More …

Author Query – S.C. Flynn

childrenofthedifferentweb150Earlier this month I reviewed S.C. Flynn’s debut Children of the Different, which I really enjoyed. Today I am part of S.C.’s blog tour for the book with an Author Query. Thanks to S.C. for dropping by and I hope you enjoy the interview.

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Let’s start with the basics. Who is S.C. Flynn?

I am an Australian/British/Irish/Italian reader and obsessive reviser. I was born in a small town in South West Western Australia, but I have lived in Europe for more than twenty years. First the United Kingdom, then Italy and currently Ireland, the home of my ancestors. That has been a great experience, but also difficult and lonely at times.  Read More …

S.C. Flynn – Children of the Different

childrenofthedifferentweb150Nineteen years ago, a brain disease known as the Great Madness killed most of the world’s population. The survivors all had something different about their minds. Now, at the start of adolescence, their children enter a trance-like state known as the Changeland and either emerge with special mental powers or as cannibalistic Ferals. 

In the great forest of south-western Australia, thirteen year-old Arika and her twin brother Narrah go through the Changeland. They encounter an enemy known as the Anteater who feeds on human life. He exists both in the Changeland and in the outside world, and he wants the twins dead. 

After their Changings, the twins have powers that let them fight their enemy and face their destiny on a long journey to an abandoned American military base on the north-west coast of Australia. If they can reach it before time runs out. 

When I was approached about reviewing Children of the Different it wasn’t hard to say yes. Apart from the fact that the author is fellow blogger S.C. Flynn, this post-apocalyptic novel sounded as if it would be interesting and exciting, especially since it is set in Australia, the land that as the joke goes is trying to kill you at every opportunity anyway, never mind there having been an apocalypse. What I found was indeed an interesting story, focused on the close bond between its protagonists, but one that left me feeling unqualified to judge certain of its aspects.  Read More …

A Quartet of Shorts

reviewamnestyMy huge plan to catch myself up on reviews during my vacation has gone hopelessly awry, in fact I think I’m even more behind now than I was when I started. Partially that’s because life, but it was also because I read a number of shorter works when we were travelling and they sort of added up. So I bundled a number of them and I present you with a quartet of shorts!  Read More …

Louise Gornall – Under Rose-Tainted Skies

Under Rose-Tainted SkiesI’m Norah, and my life happens within the walls of my house, where I live with my mom, and this evil overlord called Agoraphobia.

Everything is under control. It’s not rosy — I’m not going to win any prizes for Most Exciting Life or anything, but at least I’m safe from the outside world, right?

Wrong. This new boy, Luke, just moved in next door, and suddenly staying safe isn’t enough. If I don’t take risks, how will I ever get out — or let anyone in?

This is going to be a hard review to write. Not because Under Rose-Tainted Skies isn’t a good book, because is brilliant. And not because I didn’t love it, because I loved it to pieces. But because reviewing this book and explaining why I find it so absolutely wonderful means I’ll have to get personal and that is always somewhat scary.  Read More …

Author Query – Louise Gornall

Under Rose-Tainted SkiesWhen I read the synopsis for Under Rose-Tainted Skies I knew I had to read this book. Mental health representation is important to me; if I hadn’t felt so embarrassed and like a failure, I would perhaps have sought help for my depression far earlier than I did and it might not have gotten so bad. In addition, one of the biggest effects of my depression was the fact that I became a shut-in, who’s main contact with the outside world was my then-boyfriend (now husband). So Norah’s struggles spoke to me strongly. I’m in the middle of the book now and it is brilliant—it hits close to home quite often, but Norah is really funny too. Look for a review tomorrow! In the mean time, I got to speak to the book’s author Louise Gornall, who I think is a YA author to watch!  Read More …

Quick Review: Tansy Rayner Roberts – Kid Dark Against the Machine

tansyraynerroberts-kiddarkagainstthemachineBack when he was called something else, Griff knew everything about superheroes, sidekicks and the mysterious machine responsible for creating them. Now, Griff is just an average guy, minding his own business. A volunteer handyman at the Boys Home—his former home—Griff spends his days clearing out gutters and building clubhouses for the orphans at the Home. Nothing heroic or remarkable about that, right?

But all of that changes when one of the Home kids starts having weird dreams about another Machine—an evil version that churns out supervillains. Griff remembers the call of the Machine, and reluctantly decides to help the kid on his mission.

And then they waltz back into Griff’s life. Those bloody heroes. Including him—The Dark—one of Australia’s mightiest and longest-running superheroes.

What’s a retired secret superhero sidekick to do?

In 2014 I read the YA anthology Kaleidoscope, which I loved. One of my absolute favourite stories in the book was Tansy Rayner Roberts’ Cookie Cutter Superhero. My first reaction on finishing it was to take to Twitter and ask whether Roberts was planning more in this world. She answered in the affirmative, and Kid Dark Against The Machine is her making good on that promise. And it was everything I could have hoped for.  Read More …

Ripley Patton – Ghost Hope

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000037_00039]Olivia Black does not feel safe. Nightmares plague her sleep and haunt her days. If she has to endure one more minute stuck in a safe house in rainy Portland, she’s going to lose it. When Mike Palmer sneaks off to find her sister Kaylee without her, it’s the last straw. She has to do something.

Then Palmer’s hackers find the Dome on a satellite feed: dark, abandoned and smack in the middle of the Oregon desert three hundred miles from where it started. If they can reach it before anyone else, they can crack the computer systems and access every piece of information on PSS the CAMFers and The Hold have ever collected.

But in order to do that, Olivia must return to the origin of her fears in a race against all the forces that have ever pitted themselves against her. She must unravel decades of deceit to reveal the true origins of Psyche Sans Soma to the world at last.

With Ghost Hope Ripley Patton brings her PSS Chronicles to a close. Patton’s series is one that has to be read in order to really get the entirety of it and discussing the last book of the series without giving any spoilers for prior books is impossible. So take this as your spoiler warning.  Read More …

Corinne Duyvis – On the Edge of Gone

corinneduyvis-ontheedgeofgoneJanuary 29, 2035

That’s the day the comet is scheduled to hit—the big one. Denise and her mother and sister, Iris, have been assigned to a temporary shelter near their hometown of Amsterdam to wait out the blast, but Iris is nowhere to be found, and at the rate Denise’s addicted mother is going, they’ll never reach the shelter in time.

Then a last-minute encounter leads them to something better than a temporary shelter: a generation ship that’s scheduled to leave Earth behind and colonize new worlds after the comet hits. But each passenger must have a practical skill to contribute. Denise is autistic and fears that she’ll never be allowed to stay. Can she obtain a spot before the ship takes flight? What about her mother and sister?

When the future of the human race is at stake, whose lives matter most?

To start with full disclosure: I know the author personally, which is one of the reasons I was excited to read the book. Also I loved Corinne Duyvis’ debut Otherbound and I couldn’t wait to see her take on apocalyptic SF. So to be honest, I was already primed to like this book. But that aside, even if I hadn’t been, On the Edge of Gone blew me away and gave me insight into things that went far beyond the scope of the story.  Read More …