Tade Thompson – Rosewater

Rosewater is a town on the edge. A community formed around the edges of a mysterious alien biodome, its residents comprise the hopeful, the hungry and the helpless – people eager for a glimpse inside the dome or a taste of its rumored healing powers.

Kaaro is a government agent with a criminal past. He has seen inside the biodome, and doesn’t care to again — but when something begins killing off others like himself, Kaaro must defy his masters to search for an answer, facing his dark history and coming to a realization about a horrifying future.

Tade Thompson’s Rosewater is hard to categorise. Is this dystopia? Horror? Post-apocalypse or a slowpocalypse? Or a strange, unique amalgamation of all of them? I’m still having a hard time pinpointing it, yet it doesn’t really matter what to call it; what matters is that it is an interesting and complicated book. Rosewater tells a story that both grabbed me and didn’t let go, but also made me really uncomfortable.  Read More …

Bennett R. Coles – Ghosts of War

Spectres born of combat

The Terran military has defeated the invading fleet, but the war is far from over. As a covert agent embeds himself on Earth, advanced Centauri technology enables him to pry into the military‘s most secure files, accessing secrets that could lead to millions of deaths.

Lieutenant Commander Thomas Kane, Lieutenant Katja Emmes and Sublieutenant Jack Mallory again find themselves at the forefront of the planet’s defences. Yet terrorism isn’t the only threat they face. Given what they’ve experienced, their greatest challenge may be defeating the memories of war.

Spoilers! So proceed with caution.  Read More …

Bennett R. Coles – Virtues of War

The Terran military launches a mission to apprehend a spy on the planet known as Cerberus. The results ripple through the Centauri colonies and place the system on the brink of war. Aboard the fast-attack craft Rapier, three key personnel –Lt. Katja Emmes, Sublt. Jack Mallory and Lt. Commander Thomas Kane – will be tested as never before. How they respond will decide the fate of the earth itself.

My cats fished Virtues of War by Bennett R. Coles out of our to-read-bookcase. When I saw the cover I thought “I have to read this”. Turns out, I already had, less than three years ago. So either I have a poor memory or didn’t leave a lasting impression. I could not remember much of the story during reading, except for some flashes of recognition. When I was done, most of it came back to me and also why I had forgotten most of it.  Read More …

Pierce Brown – Morning Star

If this is the end, I will race towards it.

Darrow is the Reaper of Mars. Born to toil, carved to fight, destined to lead. But he is a broken man. Exposed as a Red in a world ruled by Golds, he has been captured and tormented until he is something less than human. And yet he is humanity’s last chance.

In facing a godlike, ruthless enemy, he must call on every last ounce of strength to prove that loyalty, friendship and love are more powerful than any coldhearted machine of war.

He has been first Red, the Gold. Now he must transcend them all. He must become the hero the people believe he is.

I have had Pierce Brown’s Morning Star for over a year now. I really liked this series. It’s up there with The Expanse and the Vorkosigan Saga (I know it is older, just found it last year) as some of the best sci-fi I have read in recent years. In part this is because it is so much more than just its genre: military sci-fi. It also features social commentary, political intrigue and good world building all around. Top it off with an intricate story, great action scenes and you have more than the sum of its parts.  Read More …

Marianne de Pierres – the Parrish Plessis trilogy : a Reread

Nylon Angel

The Tert—a toxic strip of humanity outside the city limits—is no longer big enough for bodyguard Parrish Plessis and her sadistic boss, Jamon Mondo. So with Mondo’s dingoboys on her tail, Parrish cuts a deal with a rival gang lord to steal some files that could send Mondo to death row. At the same time, she’s sheltering a suspect in the murder of news-grrl Razz Retribution. In a networld run by the media, the truth isn’t relevant. It’s bad for ratings, which is why Parrish finds herself tagged for the murder—and up to her tricked-out leather tank top in trouble….  Read More …

Annalee Newitz – Autonomous

Earth, 2144. Jack is an anti-patent scientist turned drug pirate, fabricating cheap medicines for those who can’t otherwise afford them. But her latest drug hack has left a trail of lethal overdoses.

Hot on her trail is an unlikely pair: Eliasz, a deadly military agent, and his indentured robotic partner, Paladin. As they race to stop Jack, they begin to form an uncommonly close bond that neither of them fully understands.

And underlying it all is one fundamental question: is freedom possible in a culture where everything, even people, can be owned?

Annalee Newitz’s Autonomous was a challenging read. Not because it was a slog to get through, or because I couldn’t connect to the characters, but because it posed so many questions to chew on. There are political and environmental quandaries, there was commentary on academic practices and the way research is commercialised. But perhaps more importantly to me, it made me consider my thoughts on gender identity and on power differentials in (sexual) relationships. Read More …

Sam J. Miller – Blackfish City

After the climate wars, a floating city was constructed in the Arctic Circle. Once a remarkable feat of mechanical and social engineering, it has started to crumble under the weight of its own decay — crime and corruption have set in, a terrible new disease is coursing untreated through the population, and the contradictions of incredible wealth alongside deepest poverty are spawning unrest.

Into this turmoil comes a strange new visitor — a woman accompanied by an orca and a chained polar bear. She disappears into the crowds looking for someone she lost thirty years ago, followed by the whispers of a vanished people who could bond with animals. Her arrival draws together four people and sparks a chain of events that will lead to unprecedented acts of resistance.

Sam J. Miller wasn’t an unknown name to me when Blackfish City arrived on my doorstep. I’d heard some of his short stories on the Clarkesworld podcast (read by the inimitable Kate Baker) and they were great, so I was excited to read a novel from his hand. And that excitement turned out to be completely justified. Because spoiler alert: I LOVED IT. Blackfish City may be my favourite read of the year thus far. I will try to not gush and fangirl too much, but that might prove hard with this one.  Read More …

Andrew Lane & Nigel Foster – Netherspace

This is another Wiebe review!

First contact is only the beginning…

Contact with aliens was made fourty years  ago, but communication turned out to be impossible. Humans don’t share a way of thinking with with any of the alien species, let alone a grammar. But there is trade, trade that produces scientific advances that would have taken thousands of years.

Earth may be a better place but it is no longer our own. We may be colonizing the stars, but we’re dependent on inexplicable alien netherspace drives, and they come at a heavy cost: live humans. When a group of colonists are captured by Cancri aliens, a human mission is sent to negotiate their releasse. But how can you negotiate when you don’t know what your target wants or why they took your people in the first place?

For my next read I semi-randomly picked Netherspace by Andrew Lane and Nigel Foster out of our many boxes of too-read-books. Our bookcases are coming next Monday (Editor’s Note: This review was written on November 16, the bookcases are standing right now). I had to put this book down after reading 130-some pages, as I was starting to hate-read this book. I know I am a very particular and unforgiving reader. Anytime the setting or the writing style takes me out of the story to go “wtf!” it detracts from my reading experience. This book did this too often and I just had to put it down.  Read More …

Chris Brookmyre – Places in the Darkness

As announced previously, my husband Wiebe is going to be contributing reviews more regularly. Chris Brookmyre’s Places in the Darkness is his first review on A Fantastical Librarian in a while.

This is as close to a city without crime as mankind has ever seen.

Ciudad de cielo is the city in the sky, a space station where hundreds of scientists and engineers work in earth orbit, building the colony ship that will one day take humanity to the stars.

When a mutilated body is found on the CdC, the eyes of the world are watching. Top-of-the-class investigator Alice Blake, is sent from earth to team up with CdC’s Freeman – a jaded cop with more reason than most to distrust such planetside interference.

As the death toll climbs and factions aboard the station become more and more fractious, Freeman and Blake will discover clues to a conspiracy that threatens not only their own lives but the future of humanity itself.

Based on the copy on the back of the book, I judged Places in the Darkness to be a detective novel set in space. From the rest of the cover I saw that this is not the first crime novel Chis Brookmyre has written. Writing crime in a completely fictional stetting is a hard thing to do. Not only do you have all the elements for your crime, you also have to explain the universe the story is set in. You need to split your focus and risk not doing a good job on one or both of these elements.  Read More …

Guest Post: Julie Czerneda on Saying Goodbye [plus giveaway!]

Cover art by Matthew Stawicki

Over the past few years I’ve been fortunate enough to have Julie Czerneda visit my blog as part of her tours for her latest releases. Today she is back with another one, but one that is a true milestone: the release of the final book in her Clan Chronicles. With To Guard Against The Dark, book three in the Reunification trilogy, she brings to an end a series that she started twenty years ago. I wondered how you say goodbye to characters you’ve lived with for so long. Julie wrote me the following beautiful post. Warning: tissues required! If you want to be in with a chance to win a hardcover of the book check the giveaway details at the end of the post.  Read More …