A.C. Wise – The Kissing Booth Girl and Other Stories

“Ladies and Gentlemen: I give you the Kissing Booth Girl! Lips that beguile. Oh, I promise, the nearest thing to nuzzling an angel can be yours—today!—for a shiny round Seated Liberty I know you carry in your very pockets as I speak.” But to mechanically-inclined Beni, is the ethereal girl who fell from the sky a wish come true or false hope for life beyond the confines of the odd carnival called home. Her story—as well as tales of an order of deep-sea diving nuns caring for a sunken chapel and a high school boy asked to prom by the only dead kid he’s ever met—can be found in A.C. Wise’s newest collection of the fantastical, the weird, the queer and the poignant.

Last year I read and reviewed A.C. Wise’s The Ultra Fabulous Glitter Squadron Saves the World Again and I loved it. It was fun, camp, and utterly delightful. So when Wise approached me about reviewing her latest collection, The Kissing Booth Girl and Other Stories, I agreed with alacrity, as I was keen to read more of her work. And while this collection is perhaps less exuberant than the previous one, it is a deeply thoughtful and thought-provoking set of stories, which while spanning the breadth of the speculative genre in space and time, all deal with identity and agency.  Read More …

G X Todd – Defender

In a world where long drinks are in short supply, a stranger listens to the voice in his head telling him to buy a lemonade from the girl sitting on a dusty road.

The moment locks them together.

Here and now it’s dangerous to listen to your inner voice. Those who do, keep it quiet.

These voices have purpose.

And when Pilgrim meets Lacey, there is a reason. He just doesn’t know it yet.

Defender pulls you on a wild ride to a place where the voices in your head will save or slaughter you.

G X Todd’s debut novel Defender, the first in a four-part series called The Voices, was an unexpected surprised when it arrived in the mail. The accompanying information was intriguing, but didn’t reveal much, so going in to the book I didn’t really know what to expect. I certainly hadn’t expected to find a gripping, post-apocalyptic adventure that wasn’t just engrossing in its own right, but also made me think a lot about how we regard mental illness, specifically conditions that include auditory hallucinations, such as schizophrenia.  Read More …

Review Amnesty – Hugo Novella Edition

reviewamnestyWelcome to another Review Amnesty. This time with some of the novella nominees for this year’s Hugo’s. I’ve already reviewed Daniel Polansky’s The Builders and the winner Nnedi Okorafor’s Binti, but here are the remaining three. I’ve developed a fondness for the novella format, because I’ve found it is a great way to get acquainted with an author’s writing without feeling as if you’re committing yourself to a huge time investment. Especially if you’re dealing with a very established author such as Lois McMaster Bujold, who have written a gazillion books and it is hard to know where to start. Conversely, it’ll leave you wanting to read even more books if you like an author. *looks mournfully at to-be-read shelves* All of these novellas were part of the Hugo Voter Packet 2016.  Read More …

Review Amnesty: Space Edition

reviewamnestyWelcome to another edition of Review Amnesty. As I explained earlier this week, I’ve been playing review catch up all year and it is now time to actually catch up. Today I’m starting off the latest round of Review Amnesties with a Space edition in which I review to space novels (sort of), namely Lavie Tidhar’s Central Station and Yoon Ha Lee’s Ninefox Gambit, both of which I loved for different reasons.  Read More …

Author Query – Jamison Stone

stone-runeoftheapprentice-6x9-cv-ft_hiresJamison Stone’s Rune of the Apprentice sounds like a book I’d very much enjoy  — and I one day plan to — but since I’m already terribly behind on my reading, I asked Jamison whether he’d be willing to answer some questions about the book and his writing. Luckily, he said yes, so here we are. Hopefully you’ll enjoy his answers as much as I did and check out Rune of the Apprentice!

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Let’s start with the basics. Who is Jamison Stone? 

Hello everyone! I was born in Massachusetts and raised throughout New England on a healthy diet of magic, martial arts, and meditation. I live with my loving wife and wolf, but expect to have our pack grow soon. When I am not getting distracted by video games, I am the director of Apotheosis Studios. Rune of the Apprentice is my first novel, however, there are more on the way.  Read More …

Guest Review: Lois McMaster Bujold – The Warrior’s Apprentice

Wiebe is back with another review and this time he is tackling a classic!

loismcmasterbujold-thewarriorsapprenticeMiles Vorkosigan’s physical infirmities have destroyed his lifelong dream. After flunking the physical and being dropped from the Barrarayan military academy, he takes what he thinks will be a pleasure trip. However, Miles has a towering talent for leadership-and for chaos-and he and his companions soon run afoul of spacegoing mercenaries. One thing leads to another until miles, now a self-appointed admiral with an alias, finds himself leading his mercenaries on an impossible mission. If he can’t be an officer in the Barrarayan military, perhaps miles will make a very good space pirate.

There is still one problem, however. Miles is a member of the Barrarayan aristocracy, and the law of his home planet forbids members of that class from having their own armed forces…and breaking that law carries a death sentence. 

My wife, the Fantastical Librarian, suggested Lois McMaster Bujold’s The Warrior’s Apprentice to me when we were shopping in the Forbidden Planet in London. Read More …

Guest Review: Jack Campbell – Lost Fleet: Dauntless

jackcampbell-lostfleetdauntlessToday’s review is a guest review. Wiebe has caught the review bug and has started writing up some reviews for A Fantastical Librarian. For those of you not familiar with his name, Wiebe is my husband, who also loves SFF and watches a lot of anime. And he’s got opinions. So sometimes he just needs to write them out in a review, which I happily co-opt for the blog. Today he reviews Jack Campbell’s Dauntless, the fist in the Lost Fleet series.  Read More …

Guest Post – Julie Czerneda on What’s Next & Giveaway

The Gate to Futures Past cover for releaseLast year Julie Czerneda visited A Fantastical Librarian for an Author Query to celebrate the publication of This Gulf of Time and Stars. I can’t believe enough time has passed for the next instalment of the series to be published. But The Gate to Futures Past is here and Julie is back with a great post on what it means when you ask a writer “What’s next?” Additionally, DAW is letting me hold a giveaway for 2 sets of the two books, and they are holding a tour-wide giveaway for the entire 8-book series which you can enter through the Rafflecopter widget at the end of the post.  Read More …

Author Query – Col Buchanan

colbuchanan-thehighwildI love the fact that there are more and more ways to support creators these days. And that writers are experimenting with ways to publish their work. Some are exclusively traditionally published, others self-publish, yet others become hybrid authors. Col Buchanan contacted me about his new venture, The High Wild, some or all of which he hopes to publish serially online, I was keen to ask him some questions. You can find his answers below and please do check out his new project!  Read More …

Author Query – J.D.G. Perldeiner

jdgperldeiner-havenThe premise for J.D.G. Perldeiner’s Haven was fascinating: a post-apocalyptical story set in a medieval-like society. Unfortunately, due to my evermore threatening TBR-pile — one day it will topple and crush me — I couldn’t commit to reviewing the book, but I did want to highlight it, so I asked whether I could interview J.D.G. and he agreed, even after I made the mortifying mistake of mixing up his initials. (I’m so sorry about that, JD!) Enjoy the interview and do check out Haven if you can.  Read More …