Miranda Emmerson – Miss Treadway and the Field of Stars

Soho, 1965.

In a tiny two-bed flat above a Turkish café on Neal Street lives Anna Treadway, a young dresser at the Galaxy Theatre.

When the American actress Iolanthe Green disappears after an evening’s performance at the Galaxy, the newspapers are wild with speculation about her fate. But as the news grows old and the case grows colder, it seems Anna is the only person left determined to find out the truth.

Her search for the missing actress will take her into an England she did not know existed: an England of jazz clubs and prison cells, backstreet doctors and seaside ghost towns, where her carefully calibrated existence will be upended by violence but also, perhaps, by love.

For in order to uncover Iolanthe’s secrets, Anna is going to have to face up to a few of her own…

Miss Treadway and the Field of Stars immediately drew my attention when I first came across it at last year’s Big Book Bonanza. The bright, colourful cover and the mystery posited in the cover copy captured my interest and the short presentation Miranda Emmerson gave about the influences for her story only solidified it. All of this is to say that I went into this book with high expectations—Emmerson met them all and more. Written with a light touch, the book is far more complex and far darker than its bright exterior would have you believe.  Read More …

N.K. Jemisin – The Obelisk Gate

The season of endings grows darker as civilization fades into the long cold night.

Essun—once Damaya, once Syenite, now avenger—has found shelter, but not her daughter. Instead there is Alabaster Tenring, destroyer of the world, with a request. But if Essun does what he asks, it would seal the fate of the Stillness forever.

Far away, her daughter Nassun is growing in power—and her choices will break the world.

I always struggle when writing reviews for N.K. Jemisin’s books. First of all, I’m always afraid that I can’t do the books justice. Jemisin writes such complex worlds, characters and stories with so many layers baked in that I can’t possibly understand all of it, never mind capture it in a review. Secondly, I just love the books so much that all I want to do is gush and make everyone read it. And that is not conducive to writing a coherent review. This always leads to me procrastinating on actually writing these reviews, but today is the day and I’m just going to push through it and review The Obelisk GateRead More …

Peter Newman – The Seven [Blog Tour]

Years have passed since the Vagrant journeyed to the Shining City, Vesper in arm and Gamma’s sword in hand.

Since then the world has changed. Vesper, following the footsteps of her father, journeyed to the breach and closed the tear between worlds, protecting the last of humanity, but also trapping the infernal horde and all those that fell to its corruptions: willing or otherwise.

In this new age it is Vesper who leads the charge towards unity and peace, with seemingly nothing standing between the world and a bright new future.

That is until eyes open.

And The Seven awakes.  Read More …

Peter Newman – The Vagrant and the City

This novella is set after the events of The Malice and is best enjoyed after you’ve finished that. It is centred around the Vagrant’s subsequent adventures, and teases a little of what to expect in The Seven too.

I dove right into this novella after finishing The Malice and it was a joy. Because not only do we get a glimpse of how things stand about five years after the ending of The Malice, we also get a new story completely focused on the Vagrant. He remains a unique character and it made me remember how much I enjoyed him in the first book.  Read More …

Peter Newman – The Malice

In the south, the Breach stirs.

Gamma’s sword, the Malice, wakes, calling to be taken to battle once more.

But the Vagrant has found a home now, made a life and so he turns his back, ignoring its call.

The sword cries out, frustrated, until another answers.

Her name is Vesper.

The Malice is the sequel to Peter Newman’s 2015 debut The Vagrant, which I absolutely loved. It made me coin the term lyrical grim, a description I still stand by, and it set the bar high for this sequel. A height the book easily clears, as it is a wonderful read, featuring more of Newman’s lovely prose style. The Malice takes the reader forward in time about a decade and presents them with an entirely new set of main characters, relegating the ones from The Vagrant somewhat to the background.  Read More …

Peter Newman – The Hammer and the Goat

This novelette is set parallel to events in THE VAGRANT and tells the story of what the Hammer that Walks and the goat get up to when left to their own devices…

When I read Peter Newman’s debut The Vagrant two years ago, I completely fell in love with the Goat. The other characters were great, the story was wonderful, the writing style fabulous, but the goat was what won my heart. Thus a story featuring Goat and the amazing the Hammer that Walks as well, was an immediate buy.  Read More …

Author Query – Suellen Dainty [Blog Tour]

Today, I’m pleased to be able to bring you an interview with Suellen Dainty as part of her blog tour for her latest novel The Housekeeper, which was published in early March. When I read the blurb for the book, I was immediately intrigued by the concept and curious about the inspirations behind it. Suellen was kind enough to answer my questions in detail. This is just the third stop of the tour, so be sure to check out the other stops as well, you can find the schedule at the bottom of the post.

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Let’s start with the basics. Who is Suellen Dainty?

Most importantly, I’m the mother of two children, both adults now but still children to me.

I used to be a television producer and journalist, but as the years rolled on, I became less interested in writing about what other people did and more interested in writing something for myself. Read More …

Amy Engel – The Roanoke Girls

After her mother’s suicide, fifteen year-old Lane Roanoke came to live with her grandparents and fireball cousin, Allegra, on their vast estate in rural Kansas. Lane knew little of her mother’s mysterious family, but she quickly embraced life as one of the rich and beautiful Roanoke girls. But when she discovered the dark truth at the heart of the family, she ran fast and far away.

Eleven years later, Lane is adrift in Los Angeles when her grandfather calls to tell her Allegra has gone missing. Did she run too? Or something worse? Unable to resist his pleas, Lane returns to help search, and to ease her guilt at having left Allegra behind. Her homecoming may mean a second chance with the boyfriend whose heart she broke that long ago summer. But it also means facing the devastating secret that made her flee, one she may not be strong enough to run from again.

As it weaves between Lane’s first Roanoke summer and her return, The Roanoke Girls shocks and tantalizes, twisting its way through revelation after mesmerizing revelation, exploring the secrets families keep and the fierce and terrible love that both binds them together and rips them apart.

Before I actually start this review and discuss Amy Engel’s The Roanoke Girls and my feelings about it, I want to give a content warning. Since it might be considered a spoiler, I’ve decided to put it in a footnote, so you can avoid it if you want.1 But in short, this book might be triggering to some, so Caveat Lector!  Read More …

Author Query – Claire North

Claire North has received huge accolades for her first two novels under that name — I say that name as it is an open secret that it is a pseudonym for Catherine Webb aka Kate Griffin — her third novel The Sudden Appearance of Hope was just released in paperback and her fourth novel The End of the Day is out this April. So no time like the present to have her over on A Fantastical Librarian for an Author Query. I very much enjoyed this interview and Claire’s answer for how she shelves her books is one of my favourite ones I’ve received yet. My next goal is my own book nook! I hope you enjoy the interview just as much as I did. And look for reviews of Claire’s books here on the blog in the near future.  Read More …

Emma Newman – After Atlas

Gov-corp detective Carlos Moreno was only a baby when Atlas left Earth to seek truth among the stars. But in that moment, the course of Carlos’s entire life changed. Atlas is what took his mother away, what made his father lose hope, what led Alejandro Casales, leader of the religious cult known as the Circle, to his door. And now, on the eve of the fortieth anniversary of Atlas’s departure, it’s got something to do with why Casales was found dead in his hotel room—and why Carlos is the man in charge of the investigation.

To figure out who killed one of the most powerful men on Earth, Carlos is supposed to put aside his personal history. But the deeper he delves into the case, the more he realises that escaping the past isn’t so easy. There is more to Casales’s death than meets the eye, and something much more sinister to the legacy of Atlas than anyone realises…

Let’s not bury the lede here: Emma Newman’s After Atlas is brilliant, you should all read it and I nominated it for a Hugo. Done. Everyone can go about their day. Or you can read on and find out why I loved this book so much.  Read More …