Quick ‘n Dirty: Mark Charan Newton – The Messenger

Quick ‘n Dirty is a term used for that first quick search you perform when starting a new research project. It doesn’t have to be exhaustive and all encompassing; it’s just an exploratory search to see what is out there and to collect more search terms before starting a true literature review. I thought it would be a good description for reviews of shorter works, such as short stories or novellas or for less comprehensive reviews of longer works. They may not be as in-depth as I usually try to write my reviews, but hopefully they’ll be a good introduction and indication whether you’d like the stories or books reviewed.

markcharannewton-themessengerAs an Officer of the Sun Chamber, Lucan Drakenfeld must uphold the two-hundred-year-old laws of the Vispasian Royal Union, whatever the cost. While stationed in the ancient city of Venyn, a metropolis notorious for its lawless nature, Drakenfeld receives a series of mysterious letters, written in blood, that warn of an imminent assassination attempt on the life of the city’s young Prince Bassim. Supported by his fiery colleague Leana, Drakenfeld’s investigation leads him down the city’s corridors of power. But nothing is as it seems. Who is behind the conspiracy that threatens the young prince, and will the duo be able to unearth the perpetrator before the prince’s time is up?

The Messenger is a short story set in the world of Mark Charan Newton’s Drakenfeld series. Set before the events related in the first book in the series, the eponymous Drakenfeld, it serves as a great introduction to Vispasia and Lucan Drakenfeld for those unfamiliar with the series. For those who have read the previous book The Messenger is a nice appetiser before the publication of the second book Retribution in October. 

The central mystery to the story – who is behind the assassination plot on Prince Bassim? – is an interesting one and, for such a relatively short story, complex without being convoluted. For prior readers the story also serves as a nice snap shot of Lucan’s time in Venyn, which was mentioned in the previous book, but not expounded upon. The Messenger gives a good overview of Newton’s writing style—or at least for the Drakenfeld books, as it’s rather different from his previous series Legends of the Red Sun. If you like this story, you’ll probably enjoy the other books as well. I know it’s made my wait for Retribution only harder, because I want to read more about Lucan Drakenfeld and his partner Leana.

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